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I just installed Ubuntu 14.04 on my PC next to Windows 8.1. I have a second HDD which I use to save my documents etc... I have partitioned the disk (SDB) in four NTFS partitions (I made them in Windows) but I can't mount any of them and they don't get properly displayed in fdisk -l and GParted.

Output of fdisk -l:

Disk /dev/sda: 256.1 GB, 256060514304 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 31130 cylinders, total 500118192 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes 
Disk identifier: 0x00046393

Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *        2048      206847      102400    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT 
/dev/sda2          206848   272220159   136006656    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda3       272222206   500117503   113947649    5  Extended
/dev/sda5       272222208   475076607   101427200   83  Linux
/dev/sda6       475078656   500117503    12519424   82  Linux swap / Solaris

Disk /dev/sdb: 2000.4 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders, total 3907029168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x000b689b

Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdb1              63  3907027119  1953513528+  42  SFS

The problem is that only /dev/sdb1 get displayed (but not mountable) and not the three other partitions.

Screenshot of gparted and fdisk: enter image description here

The real fun thing is that the partitions work properly in Windows.

  • Already fixed it myself. In Nautilus (other file manager) it gives an error that the NTFS partition is in a unsafe state. – Jeroen Nov 12 '14 at 17:31
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    you should add that as your own answer. – Thomas Ward Nov 12 '14 at 17:33
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SFS is the Windows dynamic partitioning format that is proprietary to Microsoft. I never used that even when I used Windows, but it used to default to that format rather than the more standard fixed NTFS.

I think you could convert if you want, or redo it if it's convenient. More information is available here.

  • That could be the answer too. I did shut down Windows normaly. I think I am going to try that. – Jeroen Nov 12 '14 at 17:37
  • Thanks for the comment; I saw the SFS indicator and assumed my answer applied; I didn't think about the hibernation mode; perhaps it somehow gets shown as SFS filesystem in that state? Let us know which it is. I've tried other file managers, but I always come back to Nautilus pretty quickly. It may not be sexy or beautiful, but it works well and has features most others lack. – Marty Fried Nov 12 '14 at 17:45
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    Your answer was the right answer though! I just did what you said (I did have to format them, but they did not contain any usefull data anyway at this time that was not backup-ed in the cloud). – Jeroen Nov 12 '14 at 18:07

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