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I am on UBUNTU 13.10, and use an NTFS partition as storage.

Typically, I mount it by clicking on the name of the partition in Nautilus. I wished to mount it automatically at startup, so I tried:

  1. From disks, edit mount options.., mount at startup (tested with "show user interface" off and on)
  2. from startup applications, creating an item

    /usr/bin/udisks --mount /dev/disk/by-uuid/500D4BE5454B55ED

In all cases, the partition shows as already mounted and can be normally accessed in nautilus. But at least some applications don't seem to see all the files inside. For instance, Virtualbox will not find my virtual machines, lightzone shows the label of the partition in media, but it will only show no files upon selecting it.

Synapse as well seems to be unable to search, but I might have done some mistake in configdb, so I will open a separate question about it if I still have problems once I solve this.

Thanks!

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    13.10 has reached end of life a while ago. Please update to 14.04 or 14.10. – Rinzwind Nov 9 '14 at 15:51
  • True, sure. But I have some critical apps which I use everyday. As soon as I have a window of a few quiet days to update, test that everything works fine and fix problems, I will. Until now I cannot run the risk and fix what is not broken. – Aldo Nov 9 '14 at 15:56
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Note: As suggested, you should definitely consider upgrading to 12.04 or 14.04. and avoid running an EOLed OS

To mount a partition at startup, we need an entry in the fstab file.

open terminal (ctrl+alt+t) and type the following command

sudo blkid

This would list down all partitions available on your system. Note down the UUID of the NTFS partition that you want to mount at boot.

now create a folder, for example sudo mkdir /media/storage. This is the folder where your ntfs partition will be mounted at. This folder will be owned by root. To give other users permission to r/w into this folder we need to give permissions. so chmod -R 777 /media/storage would be good enough. Now you need to edit your fstab file. to do so, type the following command.

sudo nano /etc/fstab

go to the bottom of the file and add the following line there.

UUID=0C0B1E /media/storage/ ntfs-3g auto,user,rw 0 0

of cource replace my UUID with the UUID that you noted down earlier. Reboot system and you should be good to go.

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  • Thank both for the answer! But, I followed your instructions closely and on startup ubuntu outputted that it couldn't find the partition, offering to skip mounting it, which I did. For the moment I am commenting out the line in fstab. Thing is, while I created the folder as instructed, in my case media/data , the folder for the partition is already present I think, in media/<myusername>/Data . I double checked and the right partition is definely sda5 – Aldo Nov 9 '14 at 15:23
  • that's the output from blkid: $ sudo blkid /dev/sda1: LABEL="PQSERVICE" UUID="5EB6C932B6C90B89" TYPE="ntfs" /dev/sda2: LABEL="SYSTEM RESERVED" UUID="C8529C51529C465A" TYPE="ntfs" /dev/sda3: UUID="C26619EE6619E3C7" TYPE="ntfs" /dev/sda5: LABEL="Data" UUID="CA88E7BC88E7A4E3" TYPE="ntfs" /dev/sda6: UUID="a55fe4bf-d74c-4bed-859d-4caef19e61a9" TYPE="ext4" /dev/sda7: UUID="c68503c2-60aa-4a36-9fa2-6d6c9af18d86" TYPE="swap" – Aldo Nov 9 '14 at 15:23
  • its right that if you mount it manually via nautilus, it gets mounted at /media/<UUID>/. if you are getting an error while booting, create the folder as root and give 777 permission to the folder and then reboot again. i have modified my answer. – astrob0t Nov 9 '14 at 15:34
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The general way to have a disk mount at startup would be to make an appropriate entry in /etc/fstab

The information that you will need for the entry can be located using findmnt while the disk is mounted, but I suspect you already have all of the required information.

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Thanks so much both! I followed the instructions but the system was unable to find the partition upon startup. So, I realized that the file already existed in media , but under media/myUserName/Data2

I changed the line in fstab to media/myUserName/Data2 , while leaving the same ID and it worked.

I am still confused why it is Data2 rather than Data, given both Data2 and Data exist in media/myUserName and sudo blkid and nautilus give Data as label, not Data2:

that's the output from blkid:

$ sudo blkid
/dev/sda1: LABEL="PQSERVICE" UUID="5EB6C932B6C90B89" TYPE="ntfs" 
/dev/sda2: LABEL="SYSTEM RESERVED" UUID="C8529C51529C465A" TYPE="ntfs" 
/dev/sda3: UUID="C26619EE6619E3C7" TYPE="ntfs" 
/dev/sda5: LABEL="Data" UUID="CA88E7BC88E7A4E3" TYPE="ntfs" 
/dev/sda6: UUID="a55fe4bf-d74c-4bed-859d-4caef19e61a9" TYPE="ext4" 
/dev/sda7: UUID="c68503c2-60aa-4a36-9fa2-6d6c9af18d86" TYPE="swap" 

In any case, now everything seems to work as it should. Not sure why the other methods I tried failed but I look again into it and will post a question if I don't understand where I went wrong.

Thanks again!

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