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Background: I was trying to get a particular Python program to work (http://mrbell.github.io/pyrmsynth/ specifically), but I got an error that seemed to indicate that Python 2.6 was required (or at least, when I googled the error and similar problems where that was what I got). Thus, I started setting up a local installation of Python 2.6 (local so I didn't disturb the original distribution and to work without su, as my system administrator). That requires some packages, I was tried to add PIP, which required activating zlib in order to run get-pip.py (as per the instructions).

Thus: As per the top response in https://stackoverflow.com/questions/12344970/building-python-from-source-with-zlib-support I changed the stated line of code. However, I need to ./configure, in Modules/zlib, but I don't know where to have ./configure target to in order to have it install properly (as I can't use the default for a local install).

So, my question: where do I target with --prefix? Or is there a better way to do this?

Note: I can get access to sudo privileges on an if-need-be basis, so if there's a dramatically easier way to do this given that, I can use that.

(Also, if there's a different place I should put this, let me know - I'm not familiar enough with all of StackExchange's services yet to know where would be the best place to put it.)

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I don't think that you need python2.6 to run this application.

You'll have to install the following dependencies though:

sudo apt-get install libgsl0ldbl python-numpy cython python-pyfits libgsl0-dev python-matplotlib

Then in the rm_tools folder of the source, run:

python ./setup.py install --user

Finally you'll be able to run:

~/Downloads/mrbell-pyrmsynth-a0f572c$ python rmsynthesis.py rmsynth.par
rmsynthesis.py ver. 1.2.1
Written by Michael Bell

Parsing parameter file...

Note: I used the default python2.7 on 14.04

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