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So what I've got set up is an NFS share with all of my desktop wallpapers (in order to save room on my Chromebook 16GB SSD).

The Fstab works and the network location comes up, but for the first thirty minutes all I get is a blue wallpaper. It seems pithy, but I want a script that forces the computer to at least reload the last wallpaper when that location becomes accessible to make for a seamless integration.

The best I can find is a mention of

"/backdrop/screen0/monitoreDP1/workspace0/last-image
/media/Wallpaper/055 - 5QD9S.jpg"

But I cannot find where that location exists and therefore can't force it to be used.

Thanks.

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  • These are settings paths in xfconf. Install and use xfce4-settings-editor, see xfce4-desktop /monitor[OUTPUT]/workspace[0-n]/last-image – aquaherd Oct 26 '14 at 16:00
  • Okay. This is certainly a helpful start. I thought I was going to just put a script into init.d to "xfdesktop -Q xfdesktop -R" to call it a day, but I'm having issues with that too. – lupaanst Oct 26 '14 at 16:24
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Thanks to anyone who assisted me in this, and feel free to comment on this code I wrote, but this got the job done for me.

#!/bin/sh

mediaConnection=0
mediaFile=/media/Wallpaper/test

while [ $mediaConnection -lt 1 ]; do
    if [ ! -f $mediaFile ]; then
        echo "File not found!"
        sleep 10
    else
        echo "File exists. Running script"
        xfdesktop -Q
        xfdesktop -R

        mediaConnection=1
    fi
done
exit

My only issue is that the script never actually ends because xfdesktop -R continually runs and all I can do is SIGINT it out with CTRL+C. But the script, as it runs, doesn't appear to be eating up any resources really, so I'm going to leave it. I'm just happy that this allows me to circulate my large library of wallpapers while not eating up the limited space on my Chromebook.

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  • Does sending xfdesktop to the background and disowning it help? xfdesktop -R & disown – muru Oct 26 '14 at 17:17
  • Not a'tall. 'xfdesktop -R' is reloading the entire instance of the desktop and it halts anything that would try to come afterward. The entire back end of my script could contain the secret to life as we know it and it would never get found out. EDIT: "halt" isn't the right word. It never gets to it, rather. – lupaanst Oct 26 '14 at 17:23

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