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I'm very new to Ubuntu, but very excited to start learning it. First, I am running Ubuntu 14.04 currently on a mid 2011 MacbookPro on a dual-boot. Most of the questions I'm finding on here are regarding the initial wireless issues with installing Ubuntu 14.04, however I already have the wifi driver installed and it worked flawlessly for about 2 weeks and now I'm having some trouble. Main issue is that it will connect to wifi and work for a little while and then disconnect entirely from all wifi for awhile then connect again, and back and forth like this indefinitely.

In MacOS I'm having no trouble at all with continuous wifi connection. As for moving around a lot, this issue is primarily coming up when I'm on my school campus using their wifi system which registers devices using the MAC address and an online authentication. Because of this, I didn't have to re-register the computer because my MacOS was already registered under the same MAC address.

That being said. I have been sitting in the same spot for almost 6 hours and roughly every 5 minutes the wifi will disconnect or reconnect. I have also installed all available software updates available using the Software Updater in Ubuntu. MacOSX firmware is also fully up to date.

I've run the wifi_script in hopes that someone can diagnose the problem (link: http://pastebin.ubuntu.com/8351930/). Thanks in advance!

UPDATE: I finally got a chance to test if it still worked on my home router (airport etreme basestation 2008-ish model) and it seems that the issue is localized to my school's campus for the 5 hours I was working with it at home I only had 1 instance of major slow down and no disconnects. I'll just have to take this into account when I have to use my Ubuntu partition. Thanks again for all your help!

  • Welcome to AU! Your problem could either be related to a change in the Wifi adapter driver of your computer (or access point) or a physical change in your environment. Did the location of your access point or computer change recently? Did somebody put a steel wall into you building? Did your neighbour get a new wifi access point that shares the frequency band with yours? Theoretically even another “rogue” client on the same or another network can deteriorate the wifi quality and cause connection losses for other users. What's the situation in Mac OS? – David Foerster Sep 15 '14 at 19:17
  • In MacOS I'm having no trouble at all with continuous wifi connection. As for moving around a lot, this issue is primarily coming up when I'm on my school campus using their wifi system which registers devices using the MAC address and an online authentication. Because of this, I didn't have to re-register the computer because my MacOS was already registered under the same MAC address. I haven't been able to test if I have the same issue with my home router yet, but I will do so when I get home. – Mossknight Sep 15 '14 at 19:53
  • Thanks for the info. Please edit your question to include it for better readability and future reference. If your trouble is with a wifi you don't own, leave out the questions that don't apply or substitute them with a suitable analogy. It seems that the question comes down to changes with your device. Did you changes any network configuration since it worked flawlessly? Were there driver or kernel updates in that period? Is the connection stable once you found a “stable” location for you computer and stay there? – David Foerster Sep 15 '14 at 20:05
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If this is an MBP 8,2 I can only offer this advice:

It won't ever be fully stable. I ran Ubuntu, and then Arch on my 8,2 up until it stopped working a few days ago and never figured out how to remedy this. Connections would always randomly 'drop'. (Disconnects but the icon indicates connected.)

Usually, a simple disconnect and reconnect fixed it. In the rare occasion, I'd have to reboot the router. This gave me stability for a few days at a time, depending on how many machines were on the network. The more congested it was, the more likely my connection would drop again and the more frequent the droppings. If you ever run into an issue where OS X will connect but Ubuntu won't, or your phone will connect but your laptop won't (etc.) a reboot on the router will also clear that up.

Also, different routers seem to 'drop' less frequently. Never has issues with Apple's Airport branded stuff. The rest, (DLink, Cisco, Netgear) have all been hit or miss.

SIDE NOTE: Heads up, if you're gonna try getting vgaswitcheroo working, be really careful. REALLY careful. You can't use a stock Ubuntu kernel. Don't even try. Kernel 3.16-2 booted once with the two cards on, then shut down and lost all use of the internal display. Mac OS X, Arch, Windows, Ubuntu. None can see that there's 15 inches of screen sitting right there. It now only works with an external monitor via OS X. Even reinstalling OSX/using the firmware recovery methods/disc won't fix it. I'm not the only person it's happened to. You've been warned.

  • I was afraid of this answer but I guess I can't really say I'm too surprised. Before I even got Ubuntu onto this machine I was reading horror stories of the stuff that went wrong trying to get it to cooperate with a 8,2 MBP. If it truly can't be helped I may just have to find another way to use Ubuntu on another machine. – Mossknight Sep 15 '14 at 20:48
  • Yeah, you can try booting up with the AMD video card disabled. It felt like that was more stable. Don't ask me why it'd affect the wifi. Its anecdotal, I've got no metrics to back it up. – amanthethy Sep 15 '14 at 20:55

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