126

How can I get the bash to look colored like this?

colored-bash

4
  • daniel451 how come you have answered for your own question within the same timings.
    – kva
    Nov 16, 2017 at 14:20
  • 7
    @kva Answering your own question at the same time as posting is encouraged across the Stack Exchange network.
    – CJ Dennis
    Jan 19, 2018 at 4:38
  • Related: askubuntu.com/questions/123268/…. It explains how individual parts of the prompt can be coloured differently. Dec 1, 2018 at 10:48
  • If you are using Termux then you can Install zshell which will change everything in your terminal, You can read this post fo the installation.learntermux.tech/2020/02/…
    – Khan Saad
    Feb 15, 2020 at 13:13

5 Answers 5

189

Open ~/.bashrc in text editor and uncomment line:

#force_color_prompt=yes

to be:

force_color_prompt=yes

save then execute source ~/.bashrc

12
  • 1
    Doesn't exactly answer the question, but I like this result better (less distracting). Oct 1, 2016 at 18:27
  • I think it does answer. why not ?
    – To Kra
    Oct 25, 2016 at 6:14
  • Here is what mine looks like after your method: !2016-10-25 16:12:15.png Not exactly as in the question. Oct 25, 2016 at 20:19
  • 1
    Is force_color_prompt=yes the intended way of enabling colors? To me forcing sounds like a workaround.
    – Jaakko
    Jan 14, 2018 at 11:09
  • 2
    I hope I didn't sound disrespectful with my comments, I'm just trying to understand how it was meant to work. For example, above those lines you mention, there's a different way of enabling colors, xterm-color|*-256color) color_prompt=yes;; Which makes me think that the colors could automatically enable if you had correct value in TERM variable.
    – Jaakko
    Mar 26, 2020 at 18:02
93

I came up with this solution:

  1. Open ~/.bashrc in a text editor.

  2. Copy this and add it at the end of the ~/.bashrc file:

    PS1='\[\033[1;36m\]\u\[\033[1;31m\]@\[\033[1;32m\]\h:\[\033[1;35m\]\w\[\033[1;31m\]\$\[\033[0m\] '
    
  3. Ssave the file and source ~/.bashrc:

    source ~/.bashrc
    

For a full list of available colors and further options, look up these links:

6
4

A version that is a bit more 'general' - should work with a varied environment:
(depends on terminfo)

Insert this in your $HOME/.bashrc:

function fgtab {
  echo "tput setf/setb - Foreground/Background table"
  for f in {0..7}; do
    for b in {0..7}; do
      echo -en "$(tput setf $f)$(tput setb $b) $f/$b "
    done
    echo -e "$(tput sgr 0)"
  done
}

# The prompt in a somewhat Terminal -type independent manner:
cname="$(tput setf 3)"
csgn="$(tput setf 4)"
chost="$(tput setf 2)"
cw="$(tput setf 6)"
crst="$(tput sgr 0)"
PS1="\[${cname}\]\u\[${csgn}\]@\[${chost}\]\h:\[${cw}\]\w\[${csgn}\]\$\[${crst}\] "

Then execute source ~/.bashrc.

After that, fgtab will display a color table with numbers. Those numbers are for tput setf n and tput setb n where 'n' is the number, 'f' stands for 'foreground' and 'b' stands for 'background' color.

tput sgr 0 will reset foreground and background colors to default.

And as you can see, changing the colors used for the prompt becomes really easy (just edit the same number in $HOME/.bashrc as you wish).

Add an $(tput setb n) in $cname if you wish to have ALL of the prompt with background n.

3
1

I've been having trouble making "force-color-prompt" to work in Ubuntu 20 using Kitty/Putty.

But notice the following code in the default Ubuntu 20 .bashrc file: case "$TERM" in xterm-color|*-256color) color_prompt=yes;; esac

So in Kitty, go to

  1. Connection
  2. Data

Then change "Terminal-type string" from "xterm" to "xterm-color" and viola!

0

If you install the minimal Ubuntu you don't get the default .bashrc that has the values for colors and some other stuff. This is the default .bashrc you can use.

# ~/.bashrc: executed by bash(1) for non-login shells.
# see /usr/share/doc/bash/examples/startup-files (in the package bash-doc)
# for examples

# If not running interactively, don't do anything
case $- in
    *i*) ;;
      *) return;;
esac

# don't put duplicate lines or lines starting with space in the history.
# See bash(1) for more options
HISTCONTROL=ignoreboth

# append to the history file, don't overwrite it
shopt -s histappend

# for setting history length see HISTSIZE and HISTFILESIZE in bash(1)
HISTSIZE=1000
HISTFILESIZE=2000

# check the window size after each command and, if necessary,
# update the values of LINES and COLUMNS.
shopt -s checkwinsize

# If set, the pattern "**" used in a pathname expansion context will
# match all files and zero or more directories and subdirectories.
#shopt -s globstar

# make less more friendly for non-text input files, see lesspipe(1)
[ -x /usr/bin/lesspipe ] && eval "$(SHELL=/bin/sh lesspipe)"

# set variable identifying the chroot you work in (used in the prompt below)
if [ -z "${debian_chroot:-}" ] && [ -r /etc/debian_chroot ]; then
    debian_chroot=$(cat /etc/debian_chroot)
fi

# set a fancy prompt (non-color, unless we know we "want" color)
case "$TERM" in
    xterm-color|*-256color) color_prompt=yes;;
esac

# uncomment for a colored prompt, if the terminal has the capability; turned
# off by default to not distract the user: the focus in a terminal window
# should be on the output of commands, not on the prompt
#force_color_prompt=yes

if [ -n "$force_color_prompt" ]; then
    if [ -x /usr/bin/tput ] && tput setaf 1 >&/dev/null; then
    # We have color support; assume it's compliant with Ecma-48
    # (ISO/IEC-6429). (Lack of such support is extremely rare, and such
    # a case would tend to support setf rather than setaf.)
    color_prompt=yes
    else
    color_prompt=
    fi
fi

if [ "$color_prompt" = yes ]; then
    PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\[\033[01;32m\]\u@\h\[\033[00m\]:\[\033[01;34m\]\w\[\033[00m\]\$ '
else
    PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\u@\h:\w\$ '
fi
unset color_prompt force_color_prompt

# If this is an xterm set the title to user@host:dir
case "$TERM" in
xterm*|rxvt*)
    PS1="\[\e]0;${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\u@\h: \w\a\]$PS1"
    ;;
*)
    ;;
esac

# enable color support of ls and also add handy aliases
if [ -x /usr/bin/dircolors ]; then
    test -r ~/.dircolors && eval "$(dircolors -b ~/.dircolors)" || eval "$(dircolors -b)"
    alias ls='ls --color=auto'
    #alias dir='dir --color=auto'
    #alias vdir='vdir --color=auto'

    alias grep='grep --color=auto'
    alias fgrep='fgrep --color=auto'
    alias egrep='egrep --color=auto'
fi

# colored GCC warnings and errors
#export GCC_COLORS='error=01;31:warning=01;35:note=01;36:caret=01;32:locus=01:quote=01'

# some more ls aliases
alias ll='ls -alF'
alias la='ls -A'
alias l='ls -CF'

# Add an "alert" alias for long running commands.  Use like so:
#   sleep 10; alert
alias alert='notify-send --urgency=low -i "$([ $? = 0 ] && echo terminal || echo error)" "$(history|tail -n1|sed -e '\''s/^\s*[0-9]\+\s*//;s/[;&|]\s*alert$//'\'')"'

# Alias definitions.
# You may want to put all your additions into a separate file like
# ~/.bash_aliases, instead of adding them here directly.
# See /usr/share/doc/bash-doc/examples in the bash-doc package.

if [ -f ~/.bash_aliases ]; then
    . ~/.bash_aliases
fi

# enable programmable completion features (you don't need to enable
# this, if it's already enabled in /etc/bash.bashrc and /etc/profile
# sources /etc/bash.bashrc).
if ! shopt -oq posix; then
  if [ -f /usr/share/bash-completion/bash_completion ]; then
    . /usr/share/bash-completion/bash_completion
  elif [ -f /etc/bash_completion ]; then
    . /etc/bash_completion
  fi
fi

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