1

This question already has an answer here:

In my house there is no internet connection, then I can't use the 'sudo apt-get install' command. I wonder if I can download a package, put it in my computer in a specific folder, and just get the terminal to install and run it? (EDIT:)Sorry, I searched for a question like mine but didn't find any, so I posted this.

marked as duplicate by Panther, karel, Braiam, Warren Hill, Sylvain Pineau Jun 13 '14 at 9:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Your thought process is semi-right. The thing is that one program, when you download it using sudo apt-get install has also dependencies on other programs (packages, may be libraries etc). I don't know the answer to your question by the way. – hytromo Jun 12 '14 at 15:33
  • It's possible - you can download .deb files, or download source and then compile it. However, there is a fair chance you will have unmet dependencies that you'll have to then install... Leading to many hunts for 'lib....'. How exactly do you plan to download them, if you don't have internet? – Mitch Jun 12 '14 at 15:56
  • this might be helpful. – souravc Jun 12 '14 at 17:23
1

You can use Cube, it is a portable package manager capable of downloading packages to any computer with internet connection (Linux or Windows) and installs it back to your computer offline.

Here is a complete tutorial on how to use it : http://community.linuxmint.com/tutorial/view/1583

0

Yes it is possible. In terminal run

sudo apt-get -s install "package-name"

this will show you all the packages that will be downloaded to install the selected program. Take this list and on another pc with internet dowonload the packages. Copy the downloaded packaged to the folder;

/var/cache/apt/archives

on your ubutu pc.

Now when you run

sudo apt-get install "package-name"

apt will find the downloaded packages in the directory and install.

!!This does not guarantee that there will be no unmet dependencies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.