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In this link, I saw a guy using findd command. But, it seems Ubuntu doesn't have this command by default.

Are there any similar alternatives or how I could get it installed (recommend the best way) ?

Update:

In that video it's mentioned on 01:49 sec. It seems, what this command does is list all files including all files in sub-folders in one list.

  • are you sure there is findd command ? – nux Feb 19 '14 at 18:17
  • On that video it's mentioned on 01:49 sec. It seems, what this command does is list all files including all sub-folders in one list. – ses Feb 19 '14 at 18:20
  • find or findd double d – nux Feb 19 '14 at 18:23
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    I believe it is an alias for ls -R – jobin Feb 19 '14 at 18:23
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This is an alias for find . I think it is some abbreviation of "find directory" or "find details" To make one for yourself use the following in terminal,

echo -e "\nalias findd='find .'">>~/.bash_aliases

And source your ~/.bash_aliases as

. ~/.bash_aliases

If you do not have ~/.bash_aliases replace all ~/.bash_aliases above with ~/.bashrc

1

findd is a Linux/UNIX command line tool which can be used to find duplicate files. The way how files are compared and considered as duplicates is configurable, e.g. compare of content, size, name etc.

If the content of the file was chosen for compare (default), the program uses the MD5 sum to check if files are equal to each other. Before calculating the complete MD5 sum of a file it first checks if the size of the file and the MD5 sum of the first 8kB.findd

Example, to finds and reports all duplicate files in the '.'-Directory excluding zero sized files. The content of the files is compared, you would

findd -i . --recursive --no-zero-files

And I think it stands for Find Duplicate.

  • findd, according to this has a compulsory argument as the path. The video the OP has shown doesn't have one. – jobin Feb 19 '14 at 19:30

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