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First off I would like to know if there is any documentation on xwinwrap. Personally I couldn't find any.

I'm trying to get my xwinwrap to work on my dual monitors. I'm running the following script to display a .wmv file on top of my desktop:

#!/bin/bash
killall -9 mplayer
killall -9 xwinwrap
xwinwrap -ni -o 0.65 -g 1920x1080 -fs -s -st -sp -b -nf -- mplayer -wid WID -quiet ~/wallpapers/blue-room.wmv -loop 0; &
xwinwrap -ni -o 0.65 -g 1920x1080+1+0 -fs -s -st -sp -b -nf --mplayer -wid WID -quiet ~/wallpapers/blue-room.wmv -loop 0; &

As you can see I'm running the xwinwrap command twice to try and specify my monitors.

The -g (geometry) command let's me specify a dimension, I get that. But I'm not quite famillair with the input of +1+0. I suppose it got something to do with setting an offset to the geometry?

Either ways, for now it only seems to run xwinwrap twice on my second monitor (not my first).

I'm using a ATI Radeon HD 5780 graphics card with Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.

If there is anyone who can help me out on this I'd greatly appreciate it.

EDIT: would I be better off using anibg?

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The +1+0 is offsetting by 1 pixel to the right. You'll want to do +1920+0 (move x by 1920, and y by 0)

So, your script will look like this:

#!/bin/bash
killall -9 mplayer
killall -9 xwinwrap
xwinwrap -ni -o 0.65 -g 1920x1080 -fs -s -st -sp -b -nf -- mplayer -wid WID -quiet ~/wallpapers/blue-room.wmv -loop 0; &
xwinwrap -ni -o 0.65 -g 1920x1080+1920+0 -fs -s -st -sp -b -nf --mplayer -wid WID -quiet ~/wallpapers/blue-room.wmv -loop 0; &

I also couldn't find much documentation, but I've been messing around with this today and found your question.

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