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I'm using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and I installed via Wubi on a partition of 27 GB. I chose the installation to be that size, too.

Then after installing some software I was prompted with a notice saying that /usr is full. In the windows that followed it shows that the total space of /usr is only 3.7 GB. I've no idea how that could happen while the Ubuntu partition has 10+ GB of free space.

So my question is: how can I expand the "size" of /usr, which makes no sense to me that it is not using the free space in the partition.

Thanks much!

The output of mount is as follows:

/dev/loop0 on / type ext4 (rw,errors=remount-ro)
proc on /proc type proc (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)
sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)
none on /sys/fs/fuse/connections type fusectl (rw)
none on /sys/kernel/debug type debugfs (rw)
none on /sys/kernel/security type securityfs (rw)
udev on /dev type devtmpfs (rw,mode=0755)
devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,noexec,nosuid,gid=5,mode=0620)
tmpfs on /run type tmpfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,size=10%,mode=0755)
none on /run/lock type tmpfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev,size=5242880)
none on /run/shm type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev)
/dev/sda7 on /host type vfat (rw,relatime,fmask=0022,dmask=0022,codepage=437,iocharset=iso8859-1,shortname=mixed,errors=remount-ro)
/host/ubuntu/disks/usr.disk on /usr type ext4 (rw)
/host/ubuntu/disks/home.disk on /home type ext4 (rw)
gvfs-fuse-daemon on /home/yzhanghf/.gvfs type fuse.gvfs-fuse-daemon (rw,nosuid,nodev,user=yzhanghf)
/dev/sda6 on /media/Scientific type fuseblk (rw,nosuid,nodev,allow_other,default_permissions,blksize=4096)
/dev/sda5 on /media/Software type fuseblk (rw,nosuid,nodev,allow_other,default_permissions,blksize=4096)
/dev/sda2 on /media/OS type fuseblk (rw,nosuid,nodev,allow_other,default_permissions,blksize=4096)
/dev/sda1 on /media/SYSTEM type fuseblk (rw,nosuid,nodev,allow_other,default_permissions,blksize=4096)
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  • Show us your partitioning scheme, my guess if /usr is on a separate partition. In that event you will need to boot a live USB and use gparted. Hard to know without more information.
    – Panther
    Commented Oct 3, 2013 at 18:53
  • Bodhi.zazen: The output of mount is just updated above. Please take a look, thanks!
    – yuanz07
    Commented Oct 3, 2013 at 18:58
  • You have a separate disk, "usr.disk " mounted at /usr and it is full. You can resize the disk - help.ubuntu.com/community/ResizeandDuplicateWubiDisk or if that is too complicated, my advices is to performs a traditional, non wubi install. IMO wubi is to "try" ubuntu, if you like it, take the time to do a traditional install, less hassle in the long run.
    – Panther
    Commented Oct 3, 2013 at 19:03

2 Answers 2

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If you install on a FAT32 partition, then there is a limitation on individual files to a max size of 4 GB or so. So, Wubi will split the install into up to 3 virtual disks (root.disk, usr.disk, home.disk) depending on the size you want. (Max 12 GB).

Unfortunately 4 GB isn't enough for /usr on a normal install as it quickly grows over time. Your best bet is to use an NTFS partition where you can have a single root.disk of up to 30 GB, or to use the partition for a direct install (if you have a free partition, why would you use Wubi anyway?)

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  • Honestly, I used wubi because I'm totally a newbie and has the record of messing up the installation of Debian :( Seems I have to reinstall the system all over. Thanks for your answer though!
    – yuanz07
    Commented Oct 3, 2013 at 19:03
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WUBI is known for causing weird problems if it was installed on a newer machine. I recommend you remove it and do a proper Ubuntu install.

If you want to fix it regardless; it looks to me like /usr is mounted as a separate partition.

Post the output of the command

mount
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  • Just updated above...
    – yuanz07
    Commented Oct 3, 2013 at 18:59
  • the output of the df command might have been helpful, maybe even more helpful...
    – Lambart
    Commented Oct 3, 2013 at 19:25

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