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I'm running Ubuntu 12.04, and two active linux images 3.2.0-37 and 3.2.0-36. In the /usr/src/ directory i find:

linux-headers-3.2.0-23    
linux-headers-3.2.0-23-generic    
linux-headers-3.2.0-26    
linux-headers-3.2.0-26-generic
linux-headers-3.2.0-29    
linux-headers-3.2.0-29-generic
linux-headers-3.2.0-31    
linux-headers-3.2.0-31-generic    
linux-headers-3.2.0-32    
linux-headers-3.2.0-32-generic    
linux-headers-3.2.0-33    
linux-headers-3.2.0-33-generic    
linux-headers-3.2.0-34    
linux-headers-3.2.0-34-generic    
linux-headers-3.2.0-35    
linux-headers-3.2.0-35-generic    
linux-headers-3.2.0-36    
linux-headers-3.2.0-36-generic     
linux-headers-3.2.0-37     
linux-headers-3.2.0-37-generic

Today I sudo apt-get purge linux-image-x.x.x.x-generic *34 and *35

I have to add that /boot contains only *36 and *37.

Is it safe to remove all of these except *37 and *36 ? Thank you in advance.

73

Those are header files are contained in the linux-headers-* and linux-headers-*-generic packages. It should be safe to remove them through apt-get. Maybe apt-get autoremove will already suggest that to you. Please do not remove them manually!

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  • 4
    apt-get autoremove did not remove the header files for me – user12345 Oct 17 '14 at 23:51
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    Except sometimes apt-get autoremove can't run because of an out of disk space error, due in part to /usr/src/linux* taking up 2G of space on a small drive. – Mark Stosberg Feb 22 '16 at 21:12
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    Yap. Sometimes it is not the disk space, but no more inodes being left -> if df -i shows 100% usage, you are de facto left with no space whatsoever. Only solution is then to delete some /usr/src/linux* stuff, to get apt to work again. – Christian Ulbrich Apr 6 '17 at 0:48
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    Try sudo apt autoremove rather than apt-get. – jaybrau Jun 12 '18 at 14:22
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    FWIW, apt-get autoremove worked for me -- freed 3.3GB of space on my 8GB AWS instance. Thank you! – jeff_mcmahan Aug 16 '18 at 2:11
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I just had this issue, and the suggestion to use apt-get autoremove did not work for me.

I resolved it by doing:

sudo apt-get purge linux-headers-3.2.0-23

on such linux headers that lived in /usr/src. I did not remove the headers that correspond to the kernel currently being used.

Restarted the server successfully.

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0

To anyone coming in off a Google search years later: You can also uninstall old kernels in the Synaptic Package Manager. Just double check which one you're currently using by typing 'uname -a' into the terminal.

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  • 2
    Your answer should explain how to do this, specifically. – Elijah Lynn Mar 3 '17 at 20:08

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