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I recently got a new PC, and grafted my old SSD into it. I worked with a dual boot, and set up the windows end first. This wiped the previous windows, but kept its boot files (including an efi), while my the partition containing Ubuntu has an empty efi file.

Unfortunately, the system keeps opening in read-only mode, and my fstab has the wrong directory in it. I'm stuck on how I might locate the new directory in root (instead of the hex address that I get from lsblk -f | grep -v loop to update /etc/fstab with).

If anyone can help me recover from this issue, I'd love to hear your suggestions.

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    Please copy & paste the pastebin link to the BootInfo summary report ( do not post report), do not run the auto fix till reviewed. Use often updated ppa version over somewhat older ISO with your USB installer or any working install. help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair & sourceforge.net/p/boot-repair/home/Home If you do run a advance mode fix to install grub, be sure to update fstab with correct UUID. If you can boot recovery mode and terminal: lsblk -e 7 -o name,mountpoint,label,size,fstype,uuid,partuuid & sudoedit /etc/fstab
    – oldfred
    Sep 19, 2023 at 20:41
  • Unfortunately, the 32 bit iso just isn't running. I'm going to try the 64 but version, just in case. If this fails, I'll probably just eat the loss, and proceed to wipe and reinstall Ubuntu. Thank you for the suggestion. Sep 20, 2023 at 21:49
  • The 64 bit version ran (it is a less updated version). I can't connect to the internet while on it, for some reason, but I saved the Boot Info file to my linux home directory, and used DiskInternals Linux Reader to access it. Here's the pastebin of the Boot Info @oldfred Sep 20, 2023 at 23:07
  • It looks like Windows is on NVMe drive, but its boot is on sda's ESP. And Linux is on sda, but has boot entries in both drive's ESP, but only one in UEFI boot menu. Use Windows tools to do a repair install. Use Boot-Repair's advanced mode to totally reinstall grub.
    – oldfred
    Sep 21, 2023 at 2:29
  • @oldfred thank you for your time and helpful suggestions. When you say "do a repair install", what do you mean, precisely? If you have any videos in mind or a webpage of instructions, please do link them. I'm learning as I go along. Thanks again! Sep 21, 2023 at 19:50

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Boot-Repair is a gui based tool to repair grub or update grub menu. It does not repair Windows. It may offer a default fix (which normally works, but has an advanced mode where user can make more settings).

One of its best features is a report of the systems boot configuration which we can use to see what the issue is or what your configuration is.

Please copy & paste the pastebin link to the BootInfo summary report ( do not post report), do not run the auto fix till reviewed. Use often updated ppa version over somewhat older ISO with your USB installer or any working install.

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair & https://sourceforge.net/p/boot-repair/home/Home/

If you do run a advance mode fix to install grub, be sure to update fstab with correct UUID.

You can see some details. This info is also in the Boot-Repair report.

lsblk -e 7 -o name,mountpoint,label,size,fstype,uuid,partuuid
sudoedit /etc/fstab
sudo efibootmgr -v

UEFI boot uses GUID/partuuid to know which ESP to find boot files. Then in ESP is a 3 line grub.cfg using UUID to find full grub.cfg in your /boot.

You can have an ESP on every drive, but Ubuntu's Ubiquity installer with 22.04 & before only defaults to ESP on first drive (what ever UEFI defines as first drive).

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