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I have dual boot system with 240GB of SSD, that is equally divided between ubuntu and windows 10, now I ran out of spaces in both of the partition. I bought a new 240GB ssd and want to install windows and ubuntu into separate ssd,so I can get more space in both of the os, but I did not find any ways. I also tried to partition the new drive to mount half-half on both the system, but ubuntu not reading is as root drive. Can anybody suggest me a good approach to do this to increase partition size of dual boot system with new ssd, or to convert the system to separate ssd to boot from.

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I would run the two OS on separate drives. You could just do a clean install of Ubuntu to the new drive but if you want to transfer the existing system try the following, but take serious backups first.

  1. Partition the new disk, create new root partition and format it. Possibly also create a new swap partition on the second disk. Also if using UEFI I suggest you leave space for an EFI partition.
  2. Mount the new root partition to /mnt.
  3. Copy files from old to new root partitions - cd /; cp -axv . /mnt
  4. Edit /mnt/etc/fstab to point root at the new partition.
  5. Reboot, interrupt the boot and change the root partition to your new partition.
  6. When booted up you need to update grub. Are you running UEFI? If so dpkg-reconfigure grub-efi-amd64 should do the trick.
  7. Try rebooting and check you are running the new system.

When you are happy with the new system remove the old root from the old disk and extend the Windows partition to fill the disk.

When the above has settled down you could move /boot/efi to an EFI partition on the new disk. This would mean the ubuntu system is still bootable if the Windows disk dies.

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  • Thanks I will give it a try!
    – DevPy
    May 23 at 6:18
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You can uncouple/detach your old harddisk temporary. (As you installed the new drive you know how to do this.)

Install Ubuntu onto the new harddisk.
Shutdown.
Attach the old one again.
Boot. Then you have Windows and Ubuntu on the old disk and Ubuntu on the new one.
Uninstall Ubuntu from the old drive and partition it as you would like.

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  • doesn't it delete all the data from my old ubuntu?
    – DevPy
    May 23 at 6:19
  • Hi, I did as mentioned by you, but how can I boot into new linux and windows on fresh boot, it always boot into new linux and when I change boot drive it directly boots windows, how to make it change to ask everytime which system to boot
    – DevPy
    May 23 at 11:47
  • In that case you have to (re)install grub on one of the disks ( pref. your Ubuntu disk so you don't corrupt your Windows Bootloader). This will get you a menu every time you boot. This page will give you all the information help.ubuntu.com/community/Grub2/Installing. Capital 2 is about reinstalling. Check with GParted which disk is which and write down the name, so you install grub to the right disk. May 23 at 13:50

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