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I installed Kubuntu 21.04 on a machine with Windows a few days ago. I selected the proposed disk config during the installation and have the following partitions now:

/dev/sda

/dev/sdb

I'd like to place Kubuntu on the SSD for obvious performance reasons now. If I start a new installation I only get the options:

  • Guided - use entire disk
  • Manual

I know some things about partitioning, MBR, boot loaders and the like but I don't know enough to do a manual config for the following:

  1. Leave Windows system (sda2) and data (sdb1) where they are.
  2. Shrink sdb4 to the unallocated size of sda and move it there. (Is this even possible?)
  3. Partition the then unallocated space on sdb for Linux data.

I don't care about where the boot loader is located. It can stay where it is now on sdb.

Abandoning the recently installed Kubuntu on sdb[2|3|4] and achieving the above with a fresh installation is also an option.

UPDATE

From deleted answer herein:

No further answers required any longer. See my answer to "No available connections" after upgrading from 21.04 to 22.04:

I ended up with abandoning Ubuntu and installing openSUSE Tumbleweed. This means a few days of installing/configuring now but I don't have mercy with OSs that do not work as they did before after an upgrade. Fortunately with Linux there's always an alternative.

All mount points but /home are on the SSD now. That's fine for me.

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  • It looks like you have mixed BIOS Windows & UEFI Kubuntu installs. And that means you have newer UEFI hardware. Microsoft has required vendors to install in UEFI boot mode to gpt partiitioned drives since 2012. So did you do your own install and really want the old BIOS/MBR configuration? How you boot install/repair media for both Windows & Ubuntu is how it installs. Best to always boot in one mode or the other and if UEFI hardware to always use UEFI. But you have Windows in BIOS mode. Is reinstalling Windows in UEFI mode possible?
    – oldfred
    Oct 31, 2021 at 20:53
  • @oldfred This is a gaming laptop from 2017 with a BIOS from 2016 and according to dmidecode: "UEFI is supported". Windows was pre-installed by the OEM. I'd like to avoid reinstalling Windows, since this system is 4 years old, I'm a heavy power user/developer and there's so much configuration and setup in it. I really don't want to spend that much time again for just a secondary OS now that I'm switching to Kubuntu as my primary one. Nov 1, 2021 at 0:01
  • @oldfred I think I understand now why installing Kubuntu on sda3 was not presented as an option at installation. I read right now that GPT contains a "dummy" protective MBR which would make the Windows on the same drive unsuable. Is that correct? I also read that MBR can be converted to GPT if there is enough space between MBR and first partition. But that doesn't seem to be the case here. Nov 1, 2021 at 0:41
  • You do not want to convert MBR to gpt with a Windows drive. Windows only boots in BIOS mode from MBR and only UEFI from gpt. And with Windows conversion erases drive. There is a complicated conversion process, but those that have posted have ended up reinstalling & restoring from backups. You can dual boot Windows in BIOS mode & Kubuntu in UEFI mode, but only from UEFI boot menu, not from grub. Really more for data only drives and works with LInux with total grub reinstall. Converting to or from GPT - must have good backups. rodsbooks.com/gdisk/mbr2gpt.html
    – oldfred
    Nov 1, 2021 at 3:33
  • @oldfred Thx for the infos. Is it then possible to force the Ubuntu installation to use MBR? I think I don't need the advanced features of GPT for my planned config, do I? Nov 1, 2021 at 19:13

1 Answer 1

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Meant to be just a dummy answer to award a completed bounty to.


No further answers required any longer. See my answer to "No available connections" after upgrading from 21.04 to 22.04:

I ended up with abandoning Ubuntu and installing openSUSE Tumbleweed. This means a few days of installing/configuring now but I don't have mercy with OSs that do not work as they did before after an upgrade. Fortunately with Linux there's always an alternative.

All mount points but /home are on the SSD now. That's fine for me.

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