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For example, I have seen the term "LiveCD" in this web page: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/LiveCDCustomization

Why is it called a "LiveCD"?

And is ubuntu-20.04.2.0-desktop-amd64.iso also a LiveCD image?

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    "Live CD" is not an Ubuntu exclusive term. It became a common expression to refer to "a complete bootable computer installation using a CD-ROM"
    – Dan
    Jun 17 at 9:03
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    Most Ubuntu media is live, ie. bootable and usable on it's own. There are exceptions though. Default installers ubiquity (desktop), calamares (some flavors), & subiquity (server) all run on live media; though some older ISOs still use the di (debian installer) which is not a live system... Lubuntu for example used the di installer so it could be used to install on machines with <768MB of RAM (too little to use live and installer at the same time)...
    – guiverc
    Jun 17 at 9:16
  • Originally bootable media did either contain an installer which would then proceed to install to the harddisk and reboot, or a complete Linux system which could optionally but not necessarily put some of its stuff to the harddisk. A fellow student used Yggdrasil Linux like this at home in the early 1990'es. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yggdrasil_Linux/GNU/X Jun 18 at 15:56
  • @guiverc in the past Ubuntu was also distributed using 2 separate discs (1 install disc + 1 live disc) like this commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ubuntu-4.10-cd.jpg probably also due to the lack of memory in that era. In fact Canonical even gave out them for free to anyone in the world and I had a couple of them
    – phuclv
    Jun 19 at 9:18
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From What is LiveCD? - Computer Hope:

The name of compact discs that contain an operating system and often other programs. LiveCDs are capable of running on the computer without having to be installed and hard drive storage space is not required. These CDs are also a way for users to try an operating system without having to format their hard drive and install it. For example, many Linux distributions are available in LiveCD format allowing Microsoft Windows users to experiment with Linux without having to erase Windows.

Many LiveCDs are saved as an ISO image, allowing a user to create a CD directly from the ISO without having to set up the CD manually. An example of a LiveCD is the Anonym.OS LiveCD, an OpenBSD OS designed to help keep the user anonymous on a network and the Internet.

And no, ubuntu-20.04.2.0-desktop-amd64.iso isn't a LiveCD until you make it a LiveCD.

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    I would add that this expression is growing synonymous with "live USB", and are being used pretty much interchangeably: it depends whichever interface an user has easier access to. Also, a technical detail: since OS iso's do not tend to fit the capacity limit of the traditional CD format any more, we now, even when it's an optical data device, rather have "live DVD"s.
    – Levente
    Jun 17 at 9:18
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    @Levente Therefore I prefer the term "live system", "live media" or "live session" (depending on the context) instead of "live CD/DVD/USB".
    – raj
    Jun 17 at 12:04
  • @muru hey man i am new here so i dont know that i can do that or not so i just wanted to share the info if this user cant search it from google so i provided him from google what's the problem here Jun 17 at 15:20
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    @ShubhangKakkar Generally (and legally) speaking you should know that you shouldn't plagiarize, anywhere, under no circumstance. There are situations where you can quote something and properly disclose the source but never as this where you posted something copied from somewhere else and tried to pass it as your own. Jun 17 at 15:23
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    OP's asking if the ISO is a "LiveCD image", which it is
    – wjandrea
    Jun 19 at 1:30
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Most Ubuntu media is live, ie. bootable and usable on it's own, allowing you to try before install. There are exceptions though (that aren't EOL or end-of-life yet)

Default installers

  • ubiquity (desktop),
  • calamares (some desktop flavors),
  • subiquity (server)

all run on live media; though some older ISOs still use the di (debian installer) which is not a live system.

Lubuntu for example used the di installer on alternate media so it could be used to install on machines with <768MB of RAM (too little to use live and installer at the same time). Non live media though is mostly EOL (eg. Lubuntu no longer supports 18.04 which was the last release that provided non-live media)

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    FYI: I ignored the word CD... Ubuntu refers to all installation media as the CD, so if you used tape, CD, DVD, HDD, SSD, flash-media, thumb-drive, it's all referred to as the CD (installation media) ... eg. CD Integrity Check docs applies regardless of the media you write your ISO to (also note the CD Integrity Check refers to older releases, 20.04 media & later does it differently)
    – guiverc
    Jun 17 at 12:03
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LiveCD - this means that this disk contains an OS or a program that can be run from the disk itself, without having to install it on another media

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