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My Ubuntu kept crashing after upgrading to Kernel 5.8. I submitted the crash reports each time. Sometimes it was in relation to the nvidia driver also upgrading to the latest version, other times it was unrelated and came up with new reasons to crash.

Also, sensors started throwing errors on the new amd_enery module and spat out an error 25 times on trying to measure power performance per core. Clearly 5.8 was causing me a lot of grief.

I've done the following command:

sudo apt remove linux-image-5.8.0-36-generic linux-modules-5.8.0-36-generic linux-modules-extra-5.8.0-36-generic linux-headers-5.8.0-36-generic linux-hwe-5.8-headers-5.8.0-36

and downgraded the nvidia driver back to 450.102.04 (from 460 when the kernel driver crashed).

I am back to 5.4.0-60-generic.

sensors is now working again properly although it doesn't try and interrogate the 3960x cpu voltage so its not obviously throwing errors.

I'll keep this thread updated on whether I am back to a stable version.

Can anyone recommend any other options here? Based on these forums, plenty of people are having issues with linux-image-5.8.0-36-generic. I presume by using the command:

sudo apt remove linux-image-5.8.0-36-generic linux-modules-5.8.0-36-generic linux-modules-extra-5.8.0-36-generic linux-headers-5.8.0-36-generic linux-hwe-5.8-headers-5.8.0-36

I've now told my system to ignore any future updates to the kernel which isn't really ideal. So what do people recommend I do from here? Kernel 5.4.0-60-generic is pretty old, but for right now, if it brings me stability, I'll stick with it, but long term I doubt its great to stay on that kernel. What do people recommend I do from here?

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There was no need to disable kernel upgrades. If linux-generic package is installed it will get upgrades for bug fixes and security.

It is normal to stay with these kernels. If you don't install new hardware there is no reason to upgrade to another major kernel especially when you have problems with the 5.8 now.

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  • I'm not sure I did disable - the way I wrote my original post was poorly put. I was asking as a question with the command I typed in my original post, did it disable updates to the kernel. The reason I ask as when I now type: sudo apt-get install linux-generic Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state information... Done linux-generic is already the newest version (5.4.0.60.63). 0 to upgrade, 0 to newly install, 0 to remove and 0 not to upgrade. – Larrikin Jan 10 at 8:59
  • To add, sudo apt-mark showhold shows that nothing is on hold. So the interesting thing is - why isn't my computer asking me to update to the latest kernel for 20.04.1? – Larrikin Jan 10 at 9:06
  • If linux-generic-hwe-20.04 isn't installed, it will never happen. Mine doesn't either ;-) – Pilot6 Jan 10 at 9:10
  • I'm a bit confused. I am currently running 20.04.01 with kernel 5.4.0-60-generic. Is that exactly where I am meant to be right now or has there been an upgrade release in the past couple of days? And secondly, am I meant to have linux-generic-hwe-20.04 installed? – Larrikin Jan 10 at 9:12
  • It is exactly what should be. I have the same. If you installed from 20.04 iso, not 20.04.1 all is perfect. If you don't want to install the 5.8 kernel, ` linux-generic-hwe-20.04` should NOT be installed. That was a mistake to add that package to 20.04.1 iso. That caused a lot of trouble. – Pilot6 Jan 10 at 9:20

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