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When I turn my Dell Precision 3500 laptop on and try to get into Ubuntu, I can't do so. I have Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS and Microsoft Windows 10 on laptop. Many words appear on screen when I try booting to Ubuntu. Among what appear to be the most diagnostic are these: "The root file system on /dev/nvme0n1p6 requests a manual fsck" and "Busybox v1.30.1 (ubuntu 1:1.30.1-4 ubuntu 6.2) built-in shell (ash) Enter 'help' for a list of built-in commands." I have no idea what a "manual fsck" is. I enter "help" and get a paragraph of what appears to be mainly nonsense.

Can someone help me figure out what to do to get Ubuntu back up and running?

Thanks.

P.S. I tried following the instructions I was given in the response below, without success. I guess I don't know what some of the terms mean. What does it mean to "boot off a Unbuntu installer drive?" is that a different drive than the one that I'm having trouble with? Also, what does "use fsck (see man fsck)" mean, and how do I do it. Lastly, I did go into Windows and search for "Fast Boot" in settings so I could disable it, but I couldn't find it there. What should I do?

Thanks.

"fsck is a command-line tool for find errors in, and repairing, damaged disks. You should boot of a Ubuntu installer drive, and use fsck (see man fsck) to repair your disk, and post your results. Also make sure you have disabled Windows Fast Boot in Windows settings."

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    fsck is a command-line tool for find errors in, and repairing, damaged disks. You should boot of a Ubuntu installer drive, and use fsck (see man fsck) to repair your disk, and post your results. Also make sure you have disabled Windows Fast Boot in Windows settings. – Pixelated Fish Oct 16 '20 at 2:05
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This is likely do to your disk being corrupted or damaged. "fsck is a command line tool" means that it is a program that does not have a GUI, or graphical user interface, thus it must be run from a terminal. man is a command used to read the manual for a specified command, in this case, fsck. Booting off a Live CD is just like you did to install ubuntu, except chose "Try Ubuntu" instead of install. You can then open terminal from the applications menu in the upper left and use it to run the previously mentioned commands. You can see more details on using fsck here. Additioanlly, I apologize for the late response; I forgot to hit the "follow" button. In future, you may want to comment and tag users with @username after responding to them with an edit so that they are notified. Please comment on this post if you have any other questions.

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