11

The Night Light filter, also known as Blue Light filter or Color Temperature filter, is a bit hard to find in Ubuntu 20.04. The Night Light tab is now in shown in the title bar, next to the Displays tab. These 2 tab labels look like they are just a title, but in fact they can be clicked on. (BTW it's Settings -> Devices -> Displays: Night Light in Ubuntu 18.04.)

17

The Night Light filter, also known as Blue Light filter or Color Temperature filter, is a bit hard to find in Ubuntu 20.04. It's found here:

  • Open the Show Applications by clicking on the 9 dots in the lower left of the screen.
  • In the 'type to search' textbox (top of screen), type 'Settings'; click on the Settings icon to open the Settings app.
  • In the Settings window, choose Displays in the left-side list of setting topics.
  • In the title bar at the very top of the window, choose the Night Light tab.
  • Turn on the Night Light / blue light filter using the on/off slider.

You can either use the built-in automatic schedule or switch to Manual Schedule using the combobox labeled 'Schedule'. Set the times and the color temp to your preferences. (I set the times as 00:00 to 23:59 so the filter is on all the time.

5
  • 1
    How's this different from older releases? If I'm not mistaken that's the same place the option is found in other releases too. Also an easier way would be to search for "night light" directly in the second step, it would show the relevant section of the Settings app which you can launch directly (so you don't have to navigate inside the Settings app). – pomsky Jun 2 '20 at 17:01
  • 1
    The convoluted access method is ok for someone who never modifies settings but others would benefit from shortcut key or desktop icon. – WinEunuuchs2Unix Jun 2 '20 at 17:14
  • @WinEunuuchs2Unix that's why I posted this - so others can use it to find the setting. – Art Swri Jul 20 '20 at 14:40
  • I'd also like a shortcut key. Sometimes I find myself using night light during the day. – Nomnom Sep 8 '20 at 18:55
  • 'Display' option is not there. – Nitish Kumar Diwakar Feb 3 at 15:48
7

For CLI lovers like me, you can also do it using gsetting:

To enable:

gsettings set org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.color night-light-enabled true

To disable:

gsettings set org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.color night-light-enabled false

With gsettings, you'll be able to make a custom script to just turn it on or off without worrying about the time schedule like so:

To set the starting hour :

gsettings set org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.color night-light-schedule-from 12.0

To set the ending hour :

gsettings set org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.color night-light-schedule-to 11.9

Here I chose 11.9 as ending and 12.0 as beginning to have it active all day long when it is enabled.

Hope it helps!

2

For Gnome customization lovers, there is 2 extensions that make anyone eyes life easier:

Both work together perfectly, with the night light slider hiding when disabled.

1

Also, on the night light settings UI, the slider responsible for setting the color temperature seems to offer a range from decently orange-yellowish to extremely orange yellowish. What I mean, even the minimum value may come across as too yellow to some.

This value however can be adjusted manually as well; either via the graphical interface offered by the app dconf-editor, or via the gsettings api from the terminal as such:

gsettings set org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.color night-light-temperature 5800

For reference, the value for no colour shift at all would be 6500.

A value around 5800-6000 offers a noticeable, but not overdone warm effect.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.