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I've noticed that Ubuntu doesn't come with a default calendar program... why not?

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  • 1
    Which version are you asking about? 11.04 and back was evolution, but as of 11.10 and making Thunderbird default over evolution...I don't think there is one. Apr 24 '12 at 0:36
  • I'm talking about since Thunderbird was made the default e-mail program Ubuntu has been limping along without a default calendar program. Evolution can't be considered the default program because it's not even installed in the default install of the OS. What is a person (noob) installing 12.04 for the first time going to think especially if their skill level is low?
    – Rob
    Apr 24 '12 at 2:40
  • You have a great point. Eek... I had the feeling from the get-go that the transition from Evolution to Thunderbird wasn't a smart idea.... Apr 24 '12 at 2:46
  • 1
    Please don't get me wrong, I'm just trying to be constructive cause I think this (our) OS has a great future and I think a good (integrated) calendar program is a must if we are trying to push 12.04 as a LTS for business use.
    – Rob
    Apr 24 '12 at 3:01
  • I agree with you 100%. OSX has a standard calendar application that integrates with everything, Windows does not..and currently Ubuntu doesn't either. Please, please let's not let OSX be the leader in this Apr 24 '12 at 3:02
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Go to >> System settings>>Details >>Default Application enter image description here

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  • everytime try to improve your answer. If your answer consists of the image then what you are trying to say will be more clear.+1 for the good answer.
    – rɑːdʒɑ
    Sep 4 '13 at 2:15
  • 4
    For me in 14.04, it says that gedit is my calendar. :-(
    – kzh
    Jun 4 '14 at 21:01
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For a calender in the sense of a list of days grouped by weeks, months and years,
there are cal and ncal (same man page);

At 2014-10-07:

$ cal
    October 2014      
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa  
          1  2  3  4  
 5  6 [7] 8  9 10 11  
12 13 14 15 16 17 18  
19 20 21 22 23 24 25  
26 27 28 29 30 31

(The [7] is shown inverted.)
To see more months, Use -A n or -B n to show n month after or before, -y for the whole year, or -3 for the current month with one month before and after:

$ cal -3      
   September 2014         October 2014         November 2014      
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa  Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa  Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa  
    1  2  3  4  5  6            1  2  3  4                     1  
 7  8  9 10 11 12 13   5  6 [7] 8  9 10 11   2  3  4  5  6  7  8  
14 15 16 17 18 19 20  12 13 14 15 16 17 18   9 10 11 12 13 14 15  
21 22 23 24 25 26 27  19 20 21 22 23 24 25  16 17 18 19 20 21 22  
28 29 30              26 27 28 29 30 31     23 24 25 26 27 28 29  
                                            30

Use ncal if you need the calendar week, the index of the week in the year; It has a different layout also:

$ ncal -w      
    October 2014      
Su     5 12 19 26   
Mo     6 13 20 27   
Tu    [7]14 21 28   
We  1  8 15 22 29   
Th  2  9 16 23 30   
Fr  3 10 17 24 31   
Sa  4 11 18 25      
   40 41 42 43 44
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  • Mere dates can be viewed using the Date/Time applet in the tray. A calendar in the sense of the question has more to do with events, appointments, etc. than knowing whether the 23rd is a Thursday or a Friday.
    – muru
    Oct 7 '14 at 18:06
  • Right, implied by the "program" in "calendar program". I added a differentiation. Oct 7 '14 at 18:59
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it doesn't? if there isn't one you can easily install any number of calender application,
This one for unity, http://news.softpedia.com/news/Introducing-Ubuntu-Calendar-Lens-for-Unity-243676.shtml
here is a list best of list, http://www.ekoob.com/best-calendar-applications-for-ubuntu-10427/

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Thunderbird does have calendaring, but it is in a separate extension called Lightning, you can install it from the software centre or

sudo apt-get install xul-ext-lightning

maybe we should think about installing this by default.

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  • That would be a good start because it's a little difficult for the new user to find, and if they could integrate it with the Gnome desktop calendar would help to make it more new user friendly.
    – Rob
    Apr 30 '12 at 1:49
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I found the answer here...View appointments in your calendar, within the Ubuntu 'Help' Documentation!

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Evolution is the default calendar program.

To test it out, click on the statusbar clock, then on the current date.

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  • As mentioned above by Ryan McClure, this is true only for Ubuntu 11.04 and earlier. I think the OP wants to know why a calendar application doesn't come installed by default in 11.10 and later. Apr 24 '12 at 2:34
  • Oh.. I upgraded to 11.10, so Evolution was already set-up as the default calendar program, I guess. Sorry for that.
    – SirCharlo
    Apr 24 '12 at 2:41
0

Ubuntu 16.04 has a calendar that you can view just by clicking on the time and date in the top right-hand corner of the screen:

Screenshot

If you install GNOME Calendar (sudo apt install gnome-calendar), you can create events, and they will appear in this widget.

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