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I have a decade worth of pictures on it. I'm using the 2020 version of Unbuntu Linux.

I found a few threads that address this issue from years ago. Are these methods still relevant for 2020?

Also, could this be an issue specifically with Unbuntu 20.04. It has been very buggy since I switched over. I plugged it into a Windows laptop/tablet hybrid and everything seems to work fine. I can access the files and see my pictures. It doesn't really have enough room for the data though.

Would running chkdsk in windows fix it for linux? Is my data in danger? Should I get it off the hard drive ASAP?

This is the error message I get:

enter image description here

When I run fdisk with the drive plugged in this is the message I get.

~$ sudo fdisk -l
Disk /dev/loop0: 156.19 MiB, 163774464 bytes, 319872 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop1: 154.26 MiB, 161751040 bytes, 315920 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop2: 93.94 MiB, 98484224 bytes, 192352 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop3: 54.97 MiB, 57614336 bytes, 112528 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop4: 54.97 MiB, 57618432 bytes, 112536 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop5: 175.88 MiB, 184406016 bytes, 360168 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop6: 160.16 MiB, 167931904 bytes, 327992 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop7: 240.82 MiB, 252493824 bytes, 493152 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/sda: 931.53 GiB, 1000204886016 bytes, 1953525168 sectors
Disk model: ST1000LM024 HN-M
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: C7E92B78-4410-4AB0-A486-4FD72E7254D2

Device       Start        End    Sectors  Size Type
/dev/sda1     2048    1050623    1048576  512M EFI System
/dev/sda2  1050624 1953523711 1952473088  931G Linux filesystem


Disk /dev/loop8: 255.58 MiB, 267980800 bytes, 523400 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop9: 132 KiB, 135168 bytes, 264 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop10: 62.9 MiB, 65105920 bytes, 127160 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop11: 583.37 MiB, 611700736 bytes, 1194728 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop12: 49.8 MiB, 52203520 bytes, 101960 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop13: 49.8 MiB, 52203520 bytes, 101960 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop14: 27.9 MiB, 28405760 bytes, 55480 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/sdb: 931.53 GiB, 1000204885504 bytes, 1953525167 sectors
Disk model: Ultra Slim PL   
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x1cdd09cc

Device     Boot Start        End    Sectors   Size Id Type
/dev/sdb1  *     2048 1953525166 1953523119 931.5G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT}

here is what running dmesg showed before and after:

enter image description here

enter image description here

  • Your drive should be recoverable. Does Ubuntu recognize the drive if you plug it in? Try it in a Windows machine as well and Windows will prompt you to fix it, if it detects the drive and the drive is damaged. – Raffles May 25 at 21:01
  • it is not recognizing my thumb drivers either. I think there is some glitch with 20.04. Can anyone confirm? – user2904033 May 25 at 22:15
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    One must run fdisk as root like this sudo fdisk. Please edit your question to add information, rather than adding it in comments. Use the formatting tools so your information is readable. – waltinator May 26 at 2:52
  • how does the formatting for code work? It press the code icon and insert the code where it says, but it is not doing anything. – user2904033 May 26 at 10:48
  • @user2904033 I've done this for you. Please accept the edit. – Parsa Mousavi May 26 at 10:49
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I fixed it by plugging the drive into a windows device and running:

chkdsk D: /f

I also got rid of 20.04. It turned out not to be the problem, but it was very buggy, and since no one in the Ubuntu community was able to help me with it, I decided not to use it.

| improve this answer | |
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Why do you rush so ?

Your drive was improperly dismounted and lost it's allocation maps.

Simply open Applications -> search for Disks

then examine your drive with Disks and repair. you did something similar with the chkdsk windows command.

| improve this answer | |
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    Do you repair with Linux disks? I don't need it now, but if the problem pops up again I will need to know. Thanks. – user2904033 May 28 at 16:52
  • I didn't rush. I waited several days for help. I would think the Linux community wants to help sort out the kinks with 20.04, and also help non expert users switch to Linux. I just got sick of windows being slow, so I switched to Linux. Now I accidentally deleted Windows. I don't miss it. But I'm not switching back to 20.04 any time soon. – user2904033 May 28 at 16:54

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