6

OS: Ubuntu 20.04

I installed gedit, kate, and libreoffice as snaps.

$ snap list (partial output)
Name                             Version                     Rev   Tracking         Publisher   Notes
gedit                            3.36.0+git7.764f9c67f       537   latest/stable    canonical✓  -
kate                             20.04.0                     64    latest/stable    kde✓        -
libreoffice                      6.4.3.2                     177   latest/stable    canonical✓  -
$ 

None of these snaps can access any hidden files and hidden folders in my home folder. Is that by design?

The ls -al output for ~/home is below:

$ ls -al
total 104
drwxr-xr-x 18 dkb  dkb   4096 May 11 16:26 .
drwxr-xr-x  3 root root  4096 Apr 26 16:12 ..
-rw-rw-r--  1 dkb  dkb   2782 May  9 07:59 .bash_aliases
-rw-------  1 dkb  dkb  10748 May  9 19:32 .bash_history
-rw-r--r--  1 dkb  dkb    220 Apr 26 16:12 .bash_logout
-rw-r--r--  1 dkb  dkb   3953 Apr 27 15:09 .bashrc
drwx------ 14 dkb  dkb   4096 May 11 15:58 .cache
drwxr-xr-x 21 dkb  dkb   4096 May 11 15:58 .config
drwxr-xr-x  2 dkb  dkb   4096 May 11 16:19 Desktop
drwxr-xr-x  2 dkb  dkb   4096 May 11 15:47 Documents
drwxr-xr-x  3 dkb  dkb   4096 May 11 16:17 Downloads
drwx------  3 dkb  dkb   4096 Apr 30 19:10 .gnupg
-rw-------  1 dkb  dkb     97 May  4 09:39 .lesshst
drwxr-xr-x  3 dkb  dkb   4096 Apr 26 16:22 .local
drwx------  5 dkb  dkb   4096 Apr 27 16:34 .mozilla
drwxr-xr-x  2 dkb  dkb   4096 Apr 26 16:22 Music
drwxr-xr-x  2 dkb  dkb   4096 May  5 16:34 Pictures
-rw-r--r--  1 dkb  dkb    807 Apr 26 16:12 .profile
drwxr-xr-x  2 dkb  dkb   4096 Apr 26 16:22 Public
drwxr-xr-x 13 dkb  dkb   4096 May 11 16:00 snap
drwx------  2 dkb  dkb   4096 Apr 26 16:36 .ssh
-rw-r--r--  1 dkb  dkb      0 Apr 26 16:31 .sudo_as_admin_successful
drwxr-xr-x  2 dkb  dkb   4096 Apr 26 16:22 Templates
drwx------  6 dkb  dkb   4096 Apr 30 19:29 .thunderbird
drwxr-xr-x  2 dkb  dkb   4096 Apr 26 16:22 Videos
$ 

The issue doesn't may not be about hidden files or folders, per se. If I copy ~/.config over to ~/Downloads all three snaps can open ~/Downloads/.config and the files therein.

On the other hand, if I copy ~/.bashrc to ~/bashrc, the snaps have no difficulty.

7
  • Could be somewhat related to this ticket, although your issue sounds quite a lot more generic. Long story short: a "snapped" process runs inside its own root file system and so the process inside does not have the same idea of the file system as you do from "the outside". May 11 '20 at 11:48
  • @0xC0000022L, I didn't want to make the question too long, but I copied ~/.bashrc to ~/bashrc and the snaps then had no difficulty. So same location, just not hidden.
    – DK Bose
    May 11 '20 at 12:00
  • sure, your question already states that, basically. Works for "normal" names, but not for "hidden" ones. So what is it you're trying to suggest here? Also, does your home folder reside under /home? You can investigate some of this by looking into $HOME/snap/<pkgname>/current while a "snapped" process is running. Similarly /snap/vlc/$PID ... May 11 '20 at 12:05
  • You can use a mount bind from .bashrc to bashrc so you do not need to create an independent copy of the hidden folder. Of course, this still involves making something hidden visible for the snap to access.
    – vanadium
    May 11 '20 at 12:10
  • "Also, does your home folder reside under /home?" Yes, that's /home/dkb. I don't know what I'm "trying to suggest". I expected to be able to access files in my home folder. I can't. Hence my question. And, say I'm running the gedit snap, what should I look for in $HOME/snap/gedit/current?
    – DK Bose
    May 11 '20 at 12:20
8

The Snap 'home' interface permits access only to non-hidden files and directories in a user's /home.

The Snap 'personal-files' interface permits access to all files and directories in a user's /home.

  • Snap interfaces are defined in the yaml file used in snap creation.
  • The personal-files interface requires an additional $snap connect foo:foo-connect. The home interface does not, which makes it more convenient for some uses.
10
  • 2
    How can one enable the "personal-files' interface? Or does that depend on whether the Snap allows enabling that interface? If would be good if you could elaborate a bit on how to make snaps access hidden files - that is in fact the question. May not be possible to enable that interface without repackaging the snap.
    – vanadium
    May 11 '20 at 12:10
  • 1
    @vanadium edited to address your comment.
    – user535733
    May 11 '20 at 12:17
  • 1
    Thanks for the answer but I still don't know what I can do as a user of these snaps to be able to edit files in my home folder. Is there a simple command I need to run? Like sudo snap connect gedit:<something-appropriate>?
    – DK Bose
    May 11 '20 at 12:32
  • 2
    @0xC0000022L error: snap "gedit" has no plug named "personal-files".
    – DK Bose
    May 11 '20 at 12:50
  • 1
    And the same message with the other snaps.
    – DK Bose
    May 11 '20 at 12:54
0

Workaround for modification of existing files only

My experience is that files in ~/.<directory> are inaccessible by default in snaps but sub-directories that are hidden, i.e.~/tmp/.<directory> seem to be accessible.

To overcome this limitation and not having to copy whole files back and forth you can create a hard-link copy of the directory recursively

example: ~/.local/... inaccessible

  • open a terminal Ctrl+Alt+T
  • create a temporary directory for the hardlinks
    • mkdir -p ~/tmp/hrdlnks
  • create hardlink copy of the whole ~/.local/ directory
    • cp -al ~/.local ~/tmp/hrdlnks/
  • now ~/tmp/hrdlnks/.local/ should be accessible
    • if for some reason they are not accessible because it is a hidden directory you could just rename it from .local to dot-local, for example.
      • mv ~/tmp/hrdlnks/.local ~/tmp/hrdlnks/dot-local
  • When you are done modifying the file(s) just delete the temporary hardlink copy directory
    • rm -r ~/tmp/hrdlnks/

Side Notes:

  • if you create a new file in this "hardlink" temporary directory you will not be creating it in the "original"/"mirrored" directory
    • you will need to copy it manually before removing the temporary hardlink directory
  • if new files get created in the "original" directory after you have made your hardlink copy, they will not exist in the hardlink copy
    • you will need to create a new hardlink copy
    • I would recommend to just delete the temporary directory once you are done modifying the files of interest.

Notes on hardlinks

  • a hardlink just points to the same "file blob of data"
  • if you delete the hardlink you are not deleting the "original" file
    • if you delete the "original" file, the hardlink still has access to the data, when you delete all hardlinks pointing towards the data, you will not have anymore access to the data, although it will still exist untill some other file overwrites those "free" bytes
  • if you change the file or directory name you are not changing the "original" names
  • if you move files around in the hardlink temp directory you will not be moving anything in the "original" directory structure

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.