0

My office is in an area where wired internet connection is poor and unstable so I'm trying to bonding 2 ISP.

I have 2 modems connected to two different phisical interfaces on my Ubuntu 18 server: eno1->192.168.1.1 eno2->192.168.2.1

With the below configuration of netplan I'm able to ping both modem but I'm not able reach internet.

someone can help me?

network:
  version: 2
  renderer: networkd

  ethernets:
   eno1:
      dhcp4: false
      dhcp6: false
   eno2:
      dhcp4: false
      dhcp6: false

  bonds:
    bond0:
      interfaces: [eno1, eno2]
      addresses:
        - 192.168.1.10/24
        - 192.168.2.10/24
      routes:
      - to: 0.0.0.0/0
        via: 192.168.1.1
      - to: 0.0.0.0/0
        via: 192.168.2.1
      nameservers:
         addresses: [8.8.8.8, 8.8.4.4]
      parameters:
        mode: balance-rr
0

Your configuration tries to treat your two modems as completely equivalent to one another for sending traffic. But this is not the case: the public IP addresses of each modem are specific to each ISP, and when your bond causes packets associated with a connection on one modem to be sent through the other modem, they will not reach their destination.

In fact, balance-rr is the worst possible bonding mode for this, since it deliberately splits the packets associated with a single TCP connection across the bond members.

Configuring two source IP addresses on the bridge with two different gateway addresses, one for each modem, also doesn't work as you intend, because there's nothing in your config that says which address is for which modem.

One option is to configure both of your modems so that they have the same internal IP address, and set up your bond interface to use balance-tlb as the mode, but this is still not guaranteed to work well for udp traffic.

Another option is to set up a server on the Internet with enough bandwidth to terminate all of your traffic, and configure two tunnels - one over each ISP connection - to terminate on this server; then set up a bond across the two tunnels and route your Internet traffic across the bond.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.