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I use Ubuntu 18.04.03, and the start was always very fast. But since I removed one of my hard disks, the procces of start takes a long time. I think somewhere there is a reference to de missing disk and the system is trying to find it until a timeout period. Where should I look for that reference to the removed disk? Or is something else? thanks

@heynnema

sudo blkid

/dev/loop0: TYPE="squashfs"

/dev/loop1: TYPE="squashfs"

/dev/loop2: TYPE="squashfs"

/dev/loop3: TYPE="squashfs"

/dev/loop4: TYPE="squashfs"

/dev/loop5: TYPE="squashfs"

/dev/loop6: TYPE="squashfs"

/dev/loop7: TYPE="squashfs"

/dev/sda1: LABEL="Documentos" UUID="c7ecde30-afc1-4320-a4f7-250339941376" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="00000001-01"

/dev/sdb1: LABEL="Xubuntu" UUID="5c2cdc58-c196-487f-91c7-b2e36ef55a4e" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="5919caf1-01"

/dev/sdb2: UUID="6e0d21bf-e194-4472-a643-abc5283dde47" TYPE="swap" PARTUUID="5919caf1-02"

/dev/sdc1: LABEL="Win7Sis" UUID="EE525BDC525BA85B" TYPE="ntfs" PARTUUID="fb0ffb0f-01"

/dev/sdc5: LABEL="Win7Datos" UUID="F8966C6B966C2BF6" TYPE="ntfs" PARTUUID="fb0ffb0f-05"

cat /etc/fstab

# /etc/fstab: static file system information.

#

# Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a

# device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices

# that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).

#

# <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass>

# / was on /dev/sdc1 during installation

UUID=5c2cdc58-c196-487f-91c7-b2e36ef55a4e / ext4 errors=remount-ro 0 1

# /home was on /dev/sdb1 during installation

UUID=c7ecde30-afc1-4320-a4f7-250339941376 /home ext4 defaults 0 2

# swap was on /dev/sda5 during installation

UUID=af9cbf4b-7a29-422e-b24a-e620301b8369 none swap sw 0 0

# swap was on /dev/sdc2 during installation

UUID=6e0d21bf-e194-4472-a643-abc5283dde47 none swap sw 0 0

I understand that at instalation time, the disks and partitions were named different than now

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  • As I don't see anything obvious in the added output. Could you add the output of systemd-analyze blame.
    – J. Starnes
    Nov 17, 2019 at 22:31

1 Answer 1

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In terminal...

sudo -H gedit /etc/fstab # edit fstab file

change:

UUID=af9cbf4b-7a29-422e-b24a-e620301b8369 none swap sw 0 0

to:

#UUID=af9cbf4b-7a29-422e-b24a-e620301b8369 none swap sw 0 0

save the file and quit gedit.

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  • Thanks. It works. Now I see that the disk with UUID=af9cbf4b-7a29-422e-b24a-e620301b8369 is not present in my system, but I didn't know where to look for
    – Pepe
    Nov 18, 2019 at 15:46

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