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In Ubuntu 19.10, I was able to successfully add one L2TP VPN that has been working great since installing 19.10.

However, upon adding an additional L2TP VPN, it not only didn't work, but it also corrupted the first L2TP VPN that was "already added and working".

This corruption is so bad, that even when I remove all VPN profiles, reboot, and add one again, it still doesn't work. At the same time, I can add the very same L2TP VPN configuration to a virtual machine of 19.10, and the L2TP VPN works fine.

I've submitted bugs regarding this here:

  1. https://gitlab.gnome.org/GNOME/gnome-control-center/issues/746
  2. https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/gnome-control-center/+bug/1849930

You can see the syslog details of a failed connection attempt at the links above.

Short of reinstalling Ubuntu 19.10, how might I undo this corruption caused by adding a 2nd L2TP VPN profile? Perhaps there are some files I can go delete to make things fresh. Please advise.

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The following PPA has a backport of network-manager-l2tp-1.2.16-1 from Debian sid which should fix this issue :

For others reading this issue, it is related to a wrong PSK being used because a transient PSK file from another VPN connection that missed out on getting deleted was used. The upstream bug report is:

Another change with new network-manager-l2tp-1.2.16-1 version is that for most VPN servers, you shouldn't need to fill in the Phase 1 & 2 algorithms anymore. It now uses a merge of proposals from Win10 and macOS/iOS/iPadOS L2TP/IPsec clients instead of using the libreswan or strongswan default set of proposals. The weakest proposals that weren't common to both Win10 and iOS were dropped, but all of the strongest ones were kept.

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I couldn't fixed my corrupted VPN using the graphical user interface. Apparently, deleting VPN profiles using gnome-control-center doesn't really completely delete them.

Ultimately, I truly deleted my profiles by deleting all files within this folder:

/etc/NetworkManager/system-connections

You can check the contents of that folder like this:

ls /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections

You can delete all files within that folder like this:

sudo rm /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/*

Thanks goes to jazzy, who provided me the location where the profiles reside via a 2008 Linux Mint forum post!

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