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The answer on Nvidia drivers - Unable to check "Force full composition pipeline" does something that makes my laptop unable to detect the external monitor. Undoing the solution restores the ability to detect the second monitor. I'm still left with tearing on any type of video playback. Youtube, video player, etc.

I am using Ubuntu 18.04 with i7-8750H and RTX 2070 (nvidia-driver-430).

Edit:

Output of inxi:

Graphics:  Card-1: Intel Device 3e9b
           Card-2: NVIDIA Device 1f10
           Display Server: x11 (X.Org 1.20.4 )
           drivers: modesetting,nvidia (unloaded: fbdev,vesa,nouveau)
           Resolution: 2560x1440@59.95hz, 1920x1080@144.00hz
           OpenGL: renderer: GeForce RTX 2070/PCIe/SSE2
           version: 4.6.0 NVIDIA 430.26

Screenshot of nvidia settings:

nvidia settings

  • Is that an optimus or nvidia only laptop? if you install inxi and run this it'll show if you don't know. inxi -G – doug Sep 2 '19 at 15:58
  • @doug I updated the question with the output you asked for. – gord0 Sep 3 '19 at 7:02
  • the checkbox is fully available and checkable in my Ubuntu 18.04-3's nvidia-440 settings Just FYI, but still working terribly with gnome – markackerman8-gmail.com Nov 18 '19 at 12:10
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Update 08/09/2019:

It seems that gord0 (OP) is right in his comment. You don't need to go through all of the steps that I had previously described (I'm not deleting them, just in case that someone find's them helpful) to get rid of tearing.

What you have to do to is:

  1. Open NVIDIA X Server Settings.

  2. Go to X Server Display Configuration.

  3. Select the screen that you want.

  4. Click the Advanced button.

  5. Enable Force Composition Pipeline or Force Full Composition Pipeline (try both and enable the one that gives you the best results).

Alternatively, you can enable Force Composition Pipeline or Force Full Composition Pipeline by running the following commands in your terminal:

  • For Force Composition Pipeline:

    nvidia-settings --assign CurrentMetaMode="$(xrandr | sed -nr '/(\S+) connected (primary )?([0-9]+x[0-9]+)(\+\S+).*/{ s//\1: \3 \4 { ForceCompositionPipeline = On }, /; H}; ${ g; s/\n//g; s/, $//; p }')"
    
  • For Force Full Composition Pipeline:

    nvidia-settings --assign CurrentMetaMode="$(xrandr | sed -nr '/(\S+) connected (primary )?([0-9]+x[0-9]+)(\+\S+).*/{ s//\1: \3 \4 { ForceFullCompositionPipeline = On }, /; H}; ${ g; s/\n//g; s/, $//; p }')"
    

These commands use xrandr and sed with some regular expressions to get the current monitor setup in the appropriate format and use it as input to the nvidia=settings --assign command, which enables the desired setting.

You should now have no screen tearing.

However, in my case, both of the above options would get disabled after rebooting.

To have Force Composition Pipeline or Force Full Composition Pipeline enabled after rebooting, do the following:

  • Run the appropriate, for your case, command from the commands above and make sure that it works correctly, that is you have no screen tearing in your monitors.

  • Add one of the following commands (depending on what worked best for you) to your startup applications:

    • For Force Composition Pipeline:

      bash -c "sleep 10 && nvidia-settings --assign CurrentMetaMode=\"$(xrandr | sed -nr '/(\S+) connected (primary )?([0-9]+x[0-9]+)(\+\S+).*/{ s//\1: \3 \4 { ForceCompositionPipeline = On }, /; H}; ${ g; s/\n//g; s/, $//; p }')\""
      
    • For Force Full Composition Pipeline:

      bash -c "sleep 10 && nvidia-settings --assign CurrentMetaMode=\"$(xrandr | sed -nr '/(\S+) connected (primary )?([0-9]+x[0-9]+)(\+\S+).*/{ s//\1: \3 \4 { ForceFullCompositionPipeline = On }, /; H}; ${ g; s/\n//g; s/, $//; p }')\""
      

    The sleep 10 command just adds a 10-seconds delay to ensure that the desktop has fully loaded before running the nvidia=settings --assign command. You may need to add a larger delay if your desktop takes more time to fully load.


Old answer. Try these if the above method doesn't work for you.

What is suggested in the answer you posted is correct for Ubuntu 16.04.

For Ubuntu 18.04 and later versions, you have to change options nvidia_387_drm modeset=1 to options nvidia-drm modeset=1 (the Nvidia driver version is no longer needed).

So what you have to do for Ubuntu 18.04 and later versions is:

  • Create a file in your /etc/modprobe.d directory called zz-nvidia-modeset.conf.

  • Add the following lines to it:

    #enable prime-sync
    options nvidia-drm modeset=1
    
  • From the terminal run:

    sudo update-initramfs -u
    
  • Reboot.

To enable the Nvidia adapter, after rebooting, you have to run

sudo prime-select nvidia

then log out and log back in.

Edit: If you are using Gnome, you will have to use another display manager, such as lightdm, since gdm does not allow external monitors to work with nomodeset=1.

To install lightdm run:

sudo apt install lightdm

After installing lightdm run

sudo dpkg-reconfigure lightdm

and select it as your display manager in the terminal window that appears.

| improve this answer | |
  • Nope. You this is incorrect. You're listing the steps I already did. I did them again and sure enough bye bye external monitor. Did sudo prime-select nvidia it told me I was already using nvidia. Undid the solution, well hello external monitor. Hello tearing. – gord0 Sep 3 '19 at 7:11
  • The instructions are correct. The problem is gdm, if you are using Gnome. You have to use lightdm as your display manager, since gdm with nomodeset does not allow external monitors. The steps above are what I do to have my second monitor without tearing on Xubuntu. I have read them in an Ask Ubuntu post that I couldn't find yesterday, but I found it today. Here it is: askubuntu.com/questions/1079135/screen-tearing-on-ubuntu-18-04 – user3140225 Sep 3 '19 at 8:18
  • @gord0 I updated my answer to include the steps to install lightdm. – user3140225 Sep 3 '19 at 8:27
  • The monitor stays connected, tearing still happens. – gord0 Sep 3 '19 at 22:57
  • Did you play around with the Nvidia settings? For example, did you enable Force Full Composition Pipeline for your external monitor? – user3140225 Sep 4 '19 at 6:21

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