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enter image description hereFirstly i am sorry for my bad EngliHello to everyone.

First of all, I apologize for my bad English. My question is; When you perform an operation that requires administrator permission in Ubuntu, you will see the admin account and the password box under it. What I want is; To be able to write our own user name and password instead of having an admin account in transactions requiring administrative privileges. Just like the windows operating system. I want this because I have an admin group and I don't want everyone to know the local administrator password.sh. If someone doing

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If your concern is about not divulging your admin password to others, but at the same time let them do operations only allowed by an administrator, you could create a separate user with admin rights and give the others the password for that.

However, everyone with admin rights (in sudoers list) can do anything on the machine, including accessing and erasing all files, etc. so I would suggest you create users without admin rights for those you do not trust having admin rights and limit access to the admin account to yourself.

If you only want to be able to do admin stuff without logging out of a limited user session and opening another one, you can open a virtual desktop (with Control + Alt + 2 for example) and login with the admin account there.

  • Thanks for your answer but not the answer to this question. – erkankyn1 Jun 14 at 6:18
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Sorry but when asked for the admin account password it asks for the users password, not a shared password. So what you are suggesting is incorrect to begin with.

I want this because I have an admin group

We all do.

and I don't want everyone to know the local administrator password.

Each user you have can be set as an admin. So each admin has its own password. It is set up like this so all the log files register that user as being the one that did something.

  • I probably misunderstood. I have an 'AD' account on the computer that has administrator rights. 1) Log in to domain account (authorized in sudoers file) 2) Do business that requires authorization. 3) 'Popup' for authorization. 4) The 'popup' that opens will be typed in the user name of the administrator we assigned during the first installation. – erkankyn1 Jun 13 at 7:00
  • That is pretty crucial info. You need to fix that on the AD side and that makes it a windows question. Even then: you can also have more than 1 admin through AD. – Rinzwind Jun 13 at 7:14
  • What should I do on the 'AD' side? – erkankyn1 Jun 13 at 7:28
  • I think this is a problem on the Ubuntu side. – erkankyn1 Jun 13 at 7:29
  • Nope. You can have 10 admins with 10 different passwords without having to do anything specific except for marking those users as an admin. – Rinzwind Jun 13 at 9:20
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The problem is solved.

Previously I opened the 'visudo' file and wrote "domainusername ALL = (ALL: ALL) ALL" but didn't work. After typing "sudo usermod -aG sudo domainusername", its now asked me for my domain account password for authorization.

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