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I use Ubuntu Studio 18.04.2 LTS (64 bit Linux).

I experimented some kind of crash, due to some app which left some too big temporary file, so the home partition was full and the system couldn't start at all.

I erased some personal files, from the documents folder (unfortunately, Ubuntu put that user data folders in that partition and I don't know some way to avoid it when we install Ubuntu) and, then, I recovered some space and the system started normally, again.

But... The question is: Where is/are and What is/are that/those useless temporary files and how to full erase it?

Is there some full automatic command line to do this?

Is there some specific GUI app to do this?

marked as duplicate by Jim, guiverc, Fabby, Eric Carvalho, qbi May 13 at 20:20

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    Ubuntu Studio 18.04 was not a LTS; have you added the PPA to get extended support for Ubuntu Studio? A full $HOME (your user directory) should not cause a no-start; just stop gui login (so normally people switch to terminal and remove files). I'm not sure what you're asking for sorry (the only files in ~/Documents/ are files you store there) – guiverc May 13 at 2:54
  • Have a look at this answer in the duplicate. – Fabby May 13 at 7:48
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Simple explanation

sudo apt autoremove removes packages and program dependancies which were once needed but now are not.

Detailed explanation

Whenever you install an application (usingapt-get) the system will also install the software that this application depends on. It is common in Ubuntu/Linux that applications share the same libraries. When you remove the appplication the dependency will stay on your system. Whenever you install an application (usingapt-get) the system will also install the software that this application depends on. It is common in Ubuntu/Linux that applications share the same libraries. When you remove the appplication the dependency will stay on your system.

So apt-get autoremove will remove those dependencies that were installed with applications and that are no longer used by anything else on the system. So apt-get autoremove will remove those dependencies that were installed with applications and that are no longer used by anything else on the system.

How to use it

To use this command simply go to your terminal and type sudo apt-get autoremove. The terminal will then show you a list of all the programs which are no longer being used on the sytem and have no use and it will prompt you to remove them with (Y) and not to remove them with (N)

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