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I am not very experienced Ubuntu user, and I have an Ubuntu server to use for some calculations. The server has several hard drives and SSD-s. The hard drive seems to be in RAID 5 set up.

The thing that confuses me is available disk space:

Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
udev            189G     0  189G   0% /dev
tmpfs            38G  2.8M   38G   1% /run
/dev/sda2       880G  205G  630G  25% /
tmpfs           189G   36K  189G   1% /dev/shm
tmpfs           5.0M  4.0K  5.0M   1% /run/lock
tmpfs           189G     0  189G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/loop0       87M   87M     0 100% /snap/core/4917
tmpfs            38G   52K   38G   1% /run/user/1000

to me it seems like /dev/sda2 is main partition to store files and it belongs to one SSD. So if I will fill system with files on 630 GB I'll run out of space.

fdisk -l   

Disk /dev/loop0: 86.9 MiB, 91099136 bytes, 177928 sectors
    Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/sdb: 894.3 GiB, 960197124096 bytes, 1875385008 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x695d460b

Device     Boot Start        End    Sectors   Size Id Type
/dev/sdb1        2048 1875385007 1875382960 894.3G 83 Linux


Disk /dev/sda: 894.3 GiB, 960197124096 bytes, 1875385008 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: E9A19E53-9515-4DD4-BD81-2FDBB653EB0A

Device     Start        End    Sectors   Size Type
/dev/sda1   2048       4095       2048     1M BIOS boot
/dev/sda2   4096 1875382271 1875378176 894.3G Linux filesystem


Disk /dev/md127: 3.5 TiB, 3840246022144 bytes, 7500480512 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 524288 bytes / 2097152 bytes


Disk /dev/sdc: 894.3 GiB, 960197124096 bytes, 1875385008 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/sdd: 894.3 GiB, 960197124096 bytes, 1875385008 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/sde: 894.3 GiB, 960197124096 bytes, 1875385008 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/sdf: 894.3 GiB, 960197124096 bytes, 1875385008 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes

And lsblk output:

:/$ lsblk
NAME    MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE  MOUNTPOINT
loop0     7:0    0  86.9M  1 loop  /snap/core/4917
sda       8:0    0 894.3G  0 disk
ââsda1    8:1    0     1M  0 part
ââsda2    8:2    0 894.3G  0 part  /
sdb       8:16   0 894.3G  0 disk
ââsdb1    8:17   0 894.3G  0 part
ââmd127   9:127  0   3.5T  0 raid5
sdc       8:32   0 894.3G  0 disk
ââmd127   9:127  0   3.5T  0 raid5
sdd       8:48   0 894.3G  0 disk
ââmd127   9:127  0   3.5T  0 raid5
sde       8:64   0 894.3G  0 disk
ââmd127   9:127  0   3.5T  0 raid5
sdf       8:80   0 894.3G  0 disk
ââmd127   9:127  0   3.5T  0 raid5

I tried to create new partition on /dev/sdb and it was successful. But when I tried to format it with sudo mkfs -t ext4 /dev/sdb1 system tells me that partition apparently in use by the system and this new partition is not displayed in df -h output.

Can someone explain set up of this system and how do I proceed? I do not really understand how do I use RAID5 hard drives and SSDs.

  • Did you get an error if you do blockdev --rereadpt /dev/sdb, this is used to refresh partition table of a drive. – ob2 Jan 21 '19 at 15:59

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