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I'm a college student and I develop web applications for some extra cash. I did my last project using combination of RoR/Puma and Ngnix on Ubuntu 14.04.

The app is running fine on its IP address (like 182.232.12.23, not local) and of course I bought a domain for it. But I thought buying the domain from the same company will be easier for my work. I generally use GoDaddy for domains. I never had a chance to install a DNS server or adding A type records manually. I generally click some stuff in GoDaddy web panel and boom its done you know.

But what I didn't know was that the company I bought the domain from doesn't provide a DNS service which is bummers for me. One of the support guys told me that I had to install DNS service to my server (which is using ngnix).
They also told me that I can use one of theirs private DNS services and they could configure it for me but I don't want to because this thing is going to be a problem in future and I don't want to live it again. I want to learn how to connect a domain to my VPS server using ssh.

I only got name server addresses, ssh info to my vps server and my domain.
I'm okay with using Ubuntu. I just don't know what to install and how to add that A record and NS addresses to my server.

I did some research and found that I had to do some stuff with bind9 but I wasn't able to do much.

  • I would look into using CloudFlare for the DNS portion, then handle DNS there to set A records and such. This way, you don't have to run DNS servers yourself. Running authoritative DNS servers yourself is a pain and has all sorts of security headaches you need to keep in mind, so it's usually easier to just use CloudFlare to manage your DNS, and then you only have to worry about setting the A records properly in CloudFlare. – Thomas Ward Jan 9 '19 at 16:06
  • Using CloudFlare solved my problem thank you very much man. – Circus Jan 10 '19 at 13:21
  • Glad to hear it. I've added my comment as an answer now, so you can mark this as accepted. – Thomas Ward Jan 10 '19 at 14:44
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I would look into using CloudFlare for the DNS portion, then handle DNS there to set A records and such.

This way, you don't have to run DNS servers yourself.

Running authoritative DNS servers yourself is a pain and has all sorts of security headaches you need to keep in mind, so it's usually easier to just use CloudFlare to manage your DNS, and then you only have to worry about setting the A records properly in CloudFlare.

This also saves you the headache of configuring a DNS server yourself - with CloudFlare having free DNS plans, it's almost better to run CloudFlare for your domain(s) instead of running your own DNS servers, unless you actually need a DNS server for something that CloudFlare is incapable of providing.

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