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Recently I did a fresh install of Lubuntu 18.04 on my machine (Asus R417S, Duo Core, 2 GHz, 2 GB RAM). Before Ubuntu 16.04 was installed. In Lubuntu 18.04 boot time to get into login screen is over 30s, I am quite sure Ubuntu 16.04 was a lot faster. (Btw: after booting Lubuntu is working fine) Not being a Linux expert myself, hopefully someone can help on tracking down a cause for the slow boot time. I know that a question about long loader time was asked here before: What are the dev-loop services that started on boot?. But in that case systemd-analyze blame showed slow services. On my machine, systemd-analyze blame only shows items of a couple of secs.

The boot plot shows for the loader stage a long gray bar.

systemd-analyze:

systemd-analyze

Startup finished in 5.603s (firmware) + 15.788s (loader) + 3.786s (kernel) + 5.643s (userspace) = 30.822s
graphical.target reached after 5.609s in userspace


systemd-analyze blame

      2.069s NetworkManager-wait-online.service
      1.734s dev-mmcblk0p2.device
      1.691s plymouth-start.service
      1.240s systemd-rfkill.service
       722ms systemd-journal-flush.service
...


systemd-analyze critical-chain

The time after the unit is active or started is printed after the "@" character.
The time the unit takes to start is printed after the "+" charaIter.

graphical.target @5.609s
└─multi-user.target @5.609s
  └─kerneloops.service @5.573s +35ms
    └─network-online.target @5.566s
      └─NetworkManager-wait-online.service @3.392s +2.174s
        └─NetworkManager.service @2.883s +497ms
          └─dbus.service @2.820s
            └─basic.target @2.735s
              └─sockets.target @2.735s
                └─cups.socket @2.735s
                  └─sysinit.target @2.726s
                    └─apparmor.service @2.226s +498ms
                      └─local-fs.target @2.203s
                        └─boot-efi.mount @2.151s +50ms
                          └─systemd-fsck@dev-disk-by\x2duuid-85B4\x2d7A39.servic
                            └─dev-disk-by\x2duuid-85B4\x2d7A39.device @1.992s

In my opinion, the most suspicuous lines in journalctl-b:

dec 07 22:29:05 asus-r417s systemd-gpt-auto-generator[224]: Failed to dissect: Input/output error
dec 07 22:29:05 asus-r417s systemd[217]: /lib/systemd/system-generators/systemd-gpt-auto-generator failed with exit status 1.


dec 07 22:29:11 asus-r417s lightdm[726]: PAM unable to dlopen(pam_gnome_keyring.so): /lib/security/pam_gnome_keyring.so: cannot open shared object file: No such file or di
dec 07 22:29:11 asus-r417s lightdm[726]: PAM adding faulty module: pam_gnome_keyring.so
dec 07 22:29:11 asus-r417s lightdm[726]: PAM unable to dlopen(pam_kwallet.so): /lib/security/pam_kwallet.so: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory
dec 07 22:29:11 asus-r417s lightdm[726]: PAM adding faulty module: pam_kwallet.so
dec 07 22:29:11 asus-r417s lightdm[726]: PAM unable to dlopen(pam_kwallet5.so): /lib/security/pam_kwallet5.so: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory
dec 07 22:29:11 asus-r417s lightdm[726]: PAM adding faulty module: pam_kwallet5.so

5 sec difference in journalctl-b:

dec 07 22:29:16 asus-r417s dbus-daemon[761]: [session uid=1000 pid=761] Successfully activated service 'com.canonical.indicator.sound-gtk2'
dec 07 22:29:21 asus-r417s pkexec[1006]: pam_unix(polkit-1:session): session opened for user root by (uid=1000)

Tried to disable pam gnome_keyring and kwallet stuff, but then I couldn't login at all (enabled it again my going to the terminal in login screen (Ctrl+Alt+F2).

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