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I recently upgraded my dead GPU to a brand new nvidia gtx 1060, the swap-over wasn't as smooth as i hoped, anyway only some solid colors in random areas are not displaying correctly, especially noticeable on the purple login screen and my black background (built in solid color). all my drivers are up to date and all AMD drivers removed, screenshot shows the difference in blacks between wallpaper and terminal (ubuntu 18.04) tia screenshot

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"In the Gnome Tweak tool under appearance you can set the adjustment for background and lock screen as 'None'. This fixed the problem for me."- John Cullen's answer to a different issue worked for this also

  • The answer you linked is a bad answer. What you should have done is install the Nvidia drivers. Ubuntu won't do it for you because it by default uses an open source driver that's inadequate for most of the new and newish high-end cards. – GabrielaGarcia Nov 15 '18 at 1:45
  • I did install the most up to date drivers from the nvidia website with no change to the issue, gnome tweak tools does iradicate the issue – Aidan mongan Nov 15 '18 at 12:13
  • Nvidia drivers are in the Ubuntu repositories up to a certain version. If it needs newer - it doesn't - then there's also a graphics drivers PPA. The generic drivers at Nvidia website don't install properly sometimes and they require steps that many users often do not do correctly. – GabrielaGarcia Nov 15 '18 at 12:16
  • Follow the instructions in the duplicate above to access the TTY (command line), remove the drivers you installed with sudo apt remove --purge nvidia*, reboot and then sudo ubuntu-drivers autoinstall. – GabrielaGarcia Nov 15 '18 at 12:21
  • If it works, it works (+1 on both Q & A). Yes, there are better ways of accomplishing this, but as a workaround, it's a good answer. (my personal and totally subjective opinion) ;-) ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ – Fabby Nov 15 '18 at 14:16

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