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Trying to install ubuntu 16.04 /boot folder on SSD and /home on HDD while creating swap partition of 16gb (default=RAM?).

Win10 is installed on the SSD while all other files are saved on the HDD. (~180gb free on SSD, ~500gb on HDD).

  1. Should the swap partition be allocated on the SSD or the HDD?

  2. I will be mainly working on Ubuntu and not on Win10, how much of the SSD should be allocated for ubuntu if I aim to save everything on the HDD except the OS?

  3. Is there a tutorial to help make the partitions for the OS on SSD and /home on HDD and the swap wherever is better? I can manage to do it myself but don't want to risk messing something up and ending up spending hours trying to sort the mess.

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Should the swap partition be allocated on the SSD or the HDD?

I doesn't matter nowadays. Avoiding write operations in a SSD was an advice given years ago when the SSDs where somehow more fragile and could wear out faster than traditional HDDs. The current generation have an expected lifespan similar to HDDs so that shouldn't be a problem.

However, in your case, given the space available I still suggest creating swap in the HDD. But the "default=RAM" isn't needed. With 16GB RAM I would have 2-4GB swap, no more, and even that is likely to be seldom used.

I will be mainly working on Ubuntu and not on Win10, how much of the SSD should be allocated for ubuntu if I aim to save everything on the HDD except the OS?

Assuming you will create a separated /home partition in the HDD then 20-25GB for the root partition in the SSD is plenty for the OS and user installed software you may want but feel free to use more if you can afford it.

Is there a tutorial to help make the partitions for the OS on SSD and /home on HDD and the swap wherever is better?

There's no tutorial per se and there are different opinions. Here's mine: /home (as much as available) and a small swap in the HDD.

You can start by shrinking the Windows partitions in Windows. Reboot a few times (to Windows) and make sure everything is working fine with the new partitions sizes. Once you have unallocated space in the drives you can proceed with the Ubuntu installation. Choose "Something Else" to manually create the different partitions in the different drives.

As a final comment, are you sure the installed Windows is in Legacy mode? Otherwise please read How do I install Ubuntu alongside a pre-installed Windows with UEFI? . The only additional step for UEFI would be, at "Something Else", to select (not format) the EFI partition which should be at the beginning of the SSD.

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    @pa4080 Thank you. Feel free to edit and improve it though. – GabrielaGarcia Oct 19 '18 at 15:16
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I agree with Garcia's answer above, and have the following to add -

1) If you plan to hibernate on Ubuntu, you should keep a swap space of at least two times your RAM. Without hibernation, it should be as much as the RAM, because Ubuntu cannot create swap-space as Windows. 2) As you have plenty of space on SSD, you can afford to keep more space for the OS. 3) If you have experience with partitioning HDD, then you'll be fine with SSD because there is no difference at user level. If not, then you could try your hands with some removable media (flash drive / CD / etc); just to be on safe side.

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https://askubuntu.com/a/1083377/881494

This Partition Table may help you to resolve your problem. please check this.

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