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I want to dual boot ubuntu 16.04.1 and 18.04.1 on my system and want to have a common Home folder for both OS. How do I do so? Will there be any problems? Also which one should I install first?

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    I can only given an opinion from when I tried it (long ago). It's not worth it. Many programs will work perfectly, and may do so for some time, but when I did it, my mail MUA (evolution) had a new feature in the later version, once I started using it - the older version couldn't read the file... Programs change between versions so you'll have to check what apps you use, and if any changes have been made that will create problems with the files used by those apps - a lot of work that I decided wasn't worth it. I loved it until I had problems (my example was from years ago) – guiverc Aug 10 '18 at 12:51
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If you have a separate home partition(say /dev/sda3), you simply have to select it on installation time to mount on /home and not to format. If you have not a separate partition you can do two things,

1: Mount the old installation disk on /ubuntu (not necessarily ubuntu) in new installation. Then link home directory inside it to /home.

ln -sf /ubuntu/home /home

OR

2: Make a separate home partition. Copy all old contents(there in /home/*) to it and mount it to /home in both of installation

here is a simple partition guilde https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-us/red_hat_enterprise_linux/5/html/deployment_guide/s1-filesystem-ext4-create

Problem or not? Generally, there would be no problem. It might be a problem if you would like different home configuration. For example if you would like to use "Powerline" on one and not on other. If you would change configuration files like .bashrc in one, the other will get same effects. So you would not enjoy separate home configurations(I don't think this, a problem)

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