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I performed a fresh install of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS on my desktop that I've been using Ubuntu on since Ubuntu 11.04. As I'm setting everything back up and installing all of the 3rd party software I regular use, I noticed in /var/log/syslog that everytime I press the 'Backspace' key on my keyboard is generates the following errors one after another:

Aug 4 18:44:49 mycomputer org.gnome.Shell.desktop[3044]: Window manager warning: Overwriting existing binding of keysym ff09 with keysym ff09 (keycode 17).

Aug 4 18:44:49 mycomputer org.gnome.Shell.desktop[3044]: Window manager warning: Overwriting existing binding of keysym 73 with keysym 73 (keycode 27).

I also notice a short stutter anytime I press the Backspace key (small delay then Backspace starts doing it's thing). Any ideas what the heck this might be and how I can resolve it?

I'm using a Corsair K90 keyboard which hasn't had this issue the past and I didn't configure any custom hotkeys yet so it's not related to anything that I specifically changed regarding key mappings.

One thing I can mention is while I didn't upgrade over my existing Ubuntu installation, my home directory hosted on separate drives was already populated with my personal files and configs from my apps so I'm wondering if something in there that was carried over may be causing this.

Any help is appreciated and please let me know if you need any additional information.

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2 Answers 2

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I temporarily it solved by uninstalling (using purge) the gnome-shell-extension-ubuntu-dock package and restarting.

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  • In Ubuntu 21.10, doing that will remove ubuntu-desktop. Mar 20 at 17:44
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Another fix for this (assuming a stock Ubuntu Desktop setup) is to open the GNOME terminal and navigate to preferences.

NOTE: The following info assumes that you haven't yet made a terminal profile. Although if you have, the process is very similar, and you will likely already know your way around this menu anyway.

Once you are in the preferences Menu, you first need to make a profile. To start this process, find the Profiles option near the bottom left corner of the window.

Next to the Profiles option, there should be a small plus sign. Click the plus.

This will start the process of creating a terminal profile. You should get a prompt here that is asking for a name for the new profile.

Once you give it a name, it should have it's own option just beneath The profiles tab from earlier. This is your key to a slew of new config options that were unavailable to you before.

This new set of menus, which appear across the top of the inner context window (upper middle to left of the window,) should now display the following options:

Text     Colors     Scrolling     Command     Compatibility

for now, it is the last option that you need.

When you click on Compatibility, you will see four dropdown menus and a button.

Clicking the button at any time in the future will Reset the button for the selected profile.

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