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I want yo install Ubuntu 18.04 on a ssd (Kingstom A400 240GB). In the last years I have' heard that you use to need to made extra configuration to optimize the lifespan and the store of it, but the time has pass, technology grow up and Ubunutu also, so maybe it is no mandatory any more. In sum, it is necessary make some extra configuration to install Ubuntu 18.04 on a ssd?

Thanks!

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    Possible duplicate of Is TRIM enabled on my Ubuntu 18.04 installation? – karel Jul 26 '18 at 15:23
  • It's not a duplicate. There are options like nodiratime and notatime which will reduce writes and consequently extend life. That said, the effect will be marginal, but certainly not a dupe. – Jeremy Jul 26 '18 at 15:30
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SSDs have come a long way since we all learned to worry about the number of writes we were doing to them.

I'd encourage you to read this page which talks about the fact that the number of writes to the SSD is no longer the main determining factor in the failure rate of SSDs, and that SSDs are now more reliable than spinning disk HDDs. The hardware of SSDs has come a long way:

A joint study between Google and the University of Toronto covering drive failure rates on data servers. The study concluded that the physical age of the SSD, rather than the amount or frequency of data written, is the prime determiner in probability of data retention errors. It also determined that SSD drives were replaced at Google data centers far less often than conventional hard drives, at about a one to four ratio.

That said, there are a couple of things which can reduce writes to SSDs. TRIM is enabled by default in 18.04 which prevents excessive writes when overwriting empty blocks. You can set the noatime and nodiratime options on partitions to prevent writes when you just read files.

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    noatime implies nodiratime. You do not need to specify both: source – Kanchu Jul 26 '18 at 16:28
  • relatime has been the default since ages ago, and has just about all the advantages of noatime without its disadvantages – AlexP Jul 26 '18 at 17:36
  • relatime still writes an access time if the current access time is more than some amount greater than the previous access time. – Jeremy Jul 27 '18 at 12:35

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