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I have a bash script named Script.sh . It worked well when it was in my /home directory.I moved it to my /bin directory,for running it as command. At first it worked well(as a command, in my /bin), but after restarting, it stopped working. When I type Script.sh , in terminal, nothing happens and I have to use Ctrl+C for getting the terminal to work again. When my Script.sh is in my /bin, my spd-say command doesn't work either(it does not pronounce the argument when I use it in terminal). After moving the script from /bin, everything gets corrected. Is there any problem, moving a file to /bin?

$ echo $PATH
:/home/m/bin:/home/m/.local/bin:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/games:/usr/local/games:/snap/bin

This is the first part of the script.

#!/bin/bash
spd-say -w "Do you know this man?"
xdg-open $(locate "X.jpg")
read a
if [ "$a" == "yes" ]
then
spd-say -w "Call the police."
else
spd-say -w "Thanks."
fi
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    @Unbesiegbarkeit Is the script expecting some sort of input ? Does it operate on files where it's stored ? If possible, provide a minimal example of what it's supposed to do – Sergiy Kolodyazhnyy Jun 5 '18 at 15:44
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    In my /home directory it works, even in /bin it worked at first, but I don't know what has happened. – Codito ergo sum Jun 5 '18 at 16:00
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    spd-say is most likely broken and stuck in an endless loop. Out of curiosity why test for "Yes" and not "Qui" instead? – WinEunuuchs2Unix Jun 5 '18 at 17:46
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    You mean 'oui'? The script was in french and I modified it for sending it to the site. Then I found that all script is in french( the --language option,etc..). So I put it in french again and I forgot to change that part. – Codito ergo sum Jun 5 '18 at 17:52
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    This would be easier to troubleshoot with an MCVE – wjandrea Jun 5 '18 at 18:11
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I have not enough reputation to make a comment, but it seems to me that you need to put your script in /usr/local/bin.

From man hier(7)

/bin
    This  directory contains executable programs which are needed in 
    single user mode and to bring the system up or repair it.

/usr/local/bin
    Binaries for programs local to the site.

You know, copy with sudo cp and check the permissions.

But if you want to use the program just for yourself, put in on /home/$USER/bin folder.

Also, you can make a symlink from your script to a path in /usr/local/bin

ln -s /full/path/to/your-script.sh /usr/local/bin/<empty or optional name>

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