There is a long time where SSD does nothing.

  • How can I find the fault and fix it ?
  • Already checked /etc/fstab, no swap or anything wrong there (32GB of RAM, no swap)

[    2.173492] usb 2-1.6: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=3
[    2.173497] usb 2-1.6: Product: DW375 Bluetooth Module
[    2.173501] usb 2-1.6: Manufacturer: Dell Computer Corp
[    2.173511] usb 2-1.6: SerialNumber: 7CE9D3C0713B
[    2.323728] ata4: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 300)
[    2.441062] input: AlpsPS/2 ALPS GlidePoint as /devices/platform/i8042/serio1/input/input6
[    2.640309] ata5: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 300)
[    2.954947] ata6: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 300)
[    3.068090] clocksource: Switched to clocksource tsc
[   36.584826] EXT4-fs (sda1): mounted filesystem with ordered data mode. Opts: (null)
[   36.726117] ip_tables: (C) 2000-2006 Netfilter Core Team
[   36.732610] systemd[1]: systemd 237 running in system mode. (+PAM +AUDIT +SELINUX +IMA +APPARMOR +SMACK +SYSVINIT +UTMP +LIBCRYPTSETUP +GCRYPT +GNUTLS +AC
L +XZ +LZ4 +SECCOMP +BLKID +ELFUTILS +KMOD -IDN2 +IDN -PCRE2 default-hierarchy=hybrid)
[   36.751996] systemd[1]: Detected architecture x86-64.
[   36.753867] systemd[1]: Set hostname to <latitude-e5520>.
[   36.868561] systemd[1]: Started Forward Password Requests to Wall Directory Watch.
[   36.868594] systemd[1]: Reached target Remote File Systems.
[   36.868751] systemd[1]: Created slice User and Session Slice.
[   36.868869] systemd[1]: Created slice System Slice.
[   36.868948] systemd[1]: Listening on udev Control Socket.
[   36.868957] systemd[1]: Reached target Slices.
[   36.868996] systemd[1]: Listening on udev Kernel Socket.
[   36.895156] EXT4-fs (sda1): re-mounted. Opts: errors=remount-ro
[   36.898185] lp: driver loaded but no devices found
[   36.903941] ppdev: user-space parallel port driver
up vote 26 down vote accepted

I upgraded to 18.04 today and encountered the same issue. I was able to fix it by booting the kernel with the noresume parameter.

Like you, I also have no swap space. At some point during the upgrade, the initramfs config was modified, adding a line pointing to a nonexistent swap partition. The slow boot was because it was looking for this partition and then timing out after 30 seconds.

To update GRUB so that it passes this option to the kernel automatically on boot:

  1. Edit the file /etc/default/grub file so that the string noresume is included in the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT line, for example:

    GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash noresume"
    
  2. Run this command to update GRUB:

    sudo update-grub
    
  3. Reboot the computer

  • 1
    noresume fixed it, nothing strange in initramfs. – user105939 May 4 at 7:15
  • 1
    I upgraded to 18.04 yesterday and I had the same problem (it took 52 seconds to boot). After setting the "noresume" parameter, it took 21 seconds. – Erol May 4 at 15:06
  • 1
    You could improve your already good answer with instructions on updating grub. – WinEunuuchs2Unix May 9 at 0:44
  • 4
    Please note that this is a workaroud, since it will prevent resuming a hibernated system. – pim May 9 at 13:52
  • I'm worried that this might prevent me from using hibernation. However this worked for me: askubuntu.com/questions/1013830/… (editing /etc/initramfs-tools/conf.d/resume, changing RESUME=none from the UUID and running update-initramfs -u) – Grey Panther Jul 11 at 20:33
$ systemd-analyze blame

Look to see which processes are taking the most time of the boot process.

  • 1
    systemd-analyze blame will not show kernel time, and for this problem. systemd-analyse time will show that it's the kernel that is stuck searching for the filesystem. – pim May 2 at 5:36
  • 1
    good hint, but the longest process took only 1.6seconds, so this tool did not help. – user105939 May 4 at 7:16

What worked for me was to run sudo rm /etc/initramfs-tools/conf.d/resume followed by sudo update-initramfs -u . This seems to be a regression from an upgrade (see https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=861151).

I upgraded to 18.04 from 16.04. Boot time was more than 10 minutes.
Tried from "No splash screen to Kernel" to find which processes are taking the most time for booting.

A start job is running for Raise network interfaces (1min 26s / 5min 24s)

So, we need to reduce time for this process to save boot time. To do so,

You have to edit,

sudo nano /etc/systemd/system/network-online.target.wants/networking.service

Find

TimeoutStartSec=5min

Change to

TimeoutStartSec=5s

and reboot

protected by Community Jul 21 at 1:54

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