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I want the terminal to show some kind of process bar based on time, like 1% every 60 seconds for example.

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    Possible duplicate of Create a progress bar in bash
    – wjandrea
    Apr 23, 2018 at 18:12
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    To reviewers: IMO this is neither unclear nor a duplicate to the linked question, it asks precisely for a fake progress bar and is quite clear about the fake data. If you consider this unclear nevertheless, please add a comment explaining how OP can improve the question.
    – dessert
    Apr 23, 2018 at 18:49
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    @dessert Re my dupe flag, I don't see how a fake progress bar is different from a real one. Edit: after reading your answer, I think I get it, but I could still use some clarity.
    – wjandrea
    Apr 23, 2018 at 20:20
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    Most of the progress bar examples I've seen online are fake in the first place so people can copy and paste them :) Apr 23, 2018 at 21:44

3 Answers 3

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Create a progress bar in bash lists approaches to get a progress bar, so I'll concentrate on the How to fake part here. I'll use 2 seconds instead of your 60 here just for testing, adjust the sleep value to your exact needs.

Using dialog, whiptail or zenity (GUI)

for i in {1..100}; do sleep 2; echo $i; done | dialog --gauge 'Running...' 6 60 0

This for loop loops1 over the numbers one to hundred and echos them every 2 seconds, the output is then piped to dialog, which shows the number as the progress on a progress bar. This approach works for whiptail and zenity --progress (GUI) as well. dialog's output looks like this with a colored progress bar using 'curses' in text mode:

dialog progress bar

Using pv

for i in {1..100}; do sleep 2; echo; done | pv -pWs100 >/dev/null

This loop is very similar, just that it prints only a newline (=1 byte of data) every 2 seconds, pv is then told to expect exactly 100 bytes of data and show a progress bar. In a terminal window with a width of 80 characters the output looks like this:

[===============>                                                          ] 22%

Constructing your own progress bar

With a simple loop you can also construct your own progress bar. Here are some examples that just print 100 # in one line, one per 2 seconds:

# number signs only
$ for i in {1..100}; do sleep 2; echo -n \#; done; echo
####################################################################################################

# with progress in % on the right
$ for i in {1..100}; do sleep 2; printf "%0.s#" $(seq 1 $i); printf "%0.s " $(seq $i 100); printf "%3d%%\r" "$i"; done; echo
######################################################                                                54%

# with progress in % on the left
$ for i in {1..100}; do sleep 2; printf "%3d%% " "$i"; printf "%0.s#" $(seq 1 $i); printf "%0.s " $(seq $i 100); printf "\r"; done; echo
 39% ####################################### 

1 Look, a Polyptoton!

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Fake Progress Bar

This progress bar uses real data in /bin directory which everyone has. The script can be "dumbed down" to suit your fake needs. Or it can be expanded for a real life application:

yad-progress-bar.gif

It uses yad which is a super-charged version of zenity the default GUI used in the terminal. To install yad use:

sudo apt install yad

Here's the code:

#!/bin/bash

# NAME: yad-progress-bar
# PATH: /mnt/e/bin
# DESC: Display yad progress bar % with names.
# DATE: Apr 23, 2018.  Modified Oct 18, 2019.

Source="/bin"
Title="Processing files for: $Source"
Count=0  
AllFiles=$(ls $Source/* | wc -l)

for f in "$Source"/* ; do

    echo "#$f"              # Display file name in progress bar.
    Count=$(( $Count + 1 ))
    Percent=$(( Count * 100 / AllFiles ))
    echo $Percent           # Display percent complete in progress bar.
    sleep .025

done | yad --progress       --auto-close \
    --width=500             --height=300 \
    --title="$Title"        --enable-log "Current filename" \
    --log-expanded          --log-height=250 \
    --log-on-top            --percentage=0 \
    --no-cancel             --center
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  • Why do you iterate over /usr/bin? Why not just use for i in {1..100} or i=100; while ((--i)) ?
    – wjandrea
    Apr 24, 2018 at 0:30
  • Two notes: 1) Use the newer command substitution syntax $() instead of backticks, which are deprecated. 2) It would be cleaner to put the yad options in an array.
    – wjandrea
    Apr 24, 2018 at 0:34
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    @wjandrea I looped through /usr/bin to give some text to the progress display. I know backticks are frowned upon these days but it was old code I had laying around which I copied without doing a lot of work. I've removed them. The yad options in an array does clean up the done line but I think this method illustrates to newcomers what is going on with the pipe to yad with all the details in one spot. Apr 24, 2018 at 0:42
  • +1 for… a nice answer. ;D OP asked for the terminal to show some kind of process bar, which is why I concentrated on non-GUI solutions, but this is not at all detrimental to the usefulness of your approach. Thanks for sharing the knowledge!
    – dessert
    Apr 24, 2018 at 6:50
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Taking the comment from @wjandream and just using for i in {1..100}, the third option is reduced to:

for ((i=0; i<=100; i++)); { echo "$i"; echo "# Downloading $i%";sleep 0.2; } | yad --progress --title="Downloading..." --height=90 --width=400 --center --text="Please wait..." --auto-close --no-buttons --no-escape

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