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I have 16.04 LTS installed on a Ryzen 1700X computer. I am able to see the frequency of each of the individual 16 threads by running the command sudo cpupower monitor. Along with the frequencies, it displays information regarding power states, and what looks like the CPU base frequency. This is an example of what is displayed:

|Mperf               
CPU | C0   | Cx   | Freq 
   0|  0.09| 99.91|  3493
   1|  0.04| 99.96|  3495
   2|  0.06| 99.94|  3498
   3|  0.06| 99.94|  3495
   4|  0.16| 99.84|  3439
   5|  0.05| 99.95|  3497
   6|  0.09| 99.91|  3494
   7|  0.10| 99.90|  3500
   8|  2.89| 97.11|  3474
   9|  0.13| 99.87|  3496
  10|  0.56| 99.44|  3485
  11|  0.07| 99.93|  3495
  12|  2.22| 97.78|  3474
  13|  0.19| 99.81|  3497
  14|  1.51| 98.49|  3490
  15|  0.01| 99.99|  3445

I have 2 requests. The first is how can I monitor these numbers in semi-real time; for a counter to show a frequency and update every 1 second? Is there a convenient feature in Bash which could repeat the command in a frequent manner?

The other concern is to strip the middle 2 columns or even better the first 3 and just leave the "Freq" column. This way I can easily input the data into Libreoffice Calc and compute averages and sums.

A possible alternative would be to setup psensor to be able to read the frequencies in real time. I am able to get psensor to display temperature and CPU usage via a modprobe command, however it does not show the fluctuation of frequencies (something I am interested in for overclocking and fine tuning purposes).

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My favorite tool is Conky which I part to the right side of one of my monitors:

CPU Powersave.gif

My code only has 8 CPU's and you would have to modify it for 16 CPUs:

#------------+
# i7-6700 CPU|
#------------+
${color2}${voffset 5}Intel® i-7 6700HQ 3.5 GHz: ${color1}@  ${color green}${freq} MHz
${color}${goto 13}CPU 0 ${goto 81}${color green}${cpu cpu1}% ${goto 131}${color3}${cpubar cpu1 18}
${color}${goto 13}CPU 1 ${goto 81}${color green}${cpu cpu2}% ${goto 131}${color3}${cpubar cpu2 18}
${color}${goto 13}CPU 2 ${goto 81}${color green}${cpu cpu3}% ${goto 131}${color3}${cpubar cpu3 18}
${color}${goto 13}CPU 3 ${goto 81}${color green}${cpu cpu4}% ${goto 131}${color3}${cpubar cpu4 18}
${color}${goto 13}CPU 4 ${goto 81}${color green}${cpu cpu5}% ${goto 131}${color3}${cpubar cpu5 18}
${color}${goto 13}CPU 5 ${goto 81}${color green}${cpu cpu6}% ${goto 131}${color3}${cpubar cpu6 18}
${color}${goto 13}CPU 6 ${goto 81}${color green}${cpu cpu7}% ${goto 131}${color3}${cpubar cpu7 18}
${color}${goto 13}CPU 7 ${goto 81}${color green}${cpu cpu8}% ${goto 131}${color3}${cpubar cpu8 18}
${color1}All CPU ${color green}${cpu}% ${goto 131}${color1}Temp: ${color green}${hwmon 1 temp 1}°C ${goto 250}${color1}Up: ${color green}$uptime
${color green}$running_processes ${color1}running of ${color green}$processes ${color1}loaded processes.
${color}Load Avg. 1-5-15 minutes: ${alignr}${color green}${execpi .001 (awk '{printf "%s/", $1}' /proc/loadavg; grep -c processor /proc/cpuinfo;) | bc -l | cut -c1-4} ${execpi .001 (awk '{printf "%s/", $2}' /proc/loadavg; grep -c processor /proc/cpuinfo;) | bc -l | cut -c1-4} ${execpi .001 (awk '{printf "%s/", $3}' /proc/loadavg; grep -c processor /proc/cpuinfo;) | bc -l | cut -c1-4}

You can literally find thousands of examples and solutions on Ubuntu Forums for Conky.

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