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Apr
4
comment Is a reboot the only way to get back into the GUI after pressing “CTRL+ALT+F12”?
The question you linked answers this.
Apr
4
answered Extend PBR_Image volume
Apr
4
comment Failed to get canonical path of /cow
You don't have a method. /usr/sbin is on the path already so there is no need to cd there. You can't run grub-install and update-grub directly from the live cd ( as you noted ) because it tries to set up grub to boot the current system, which would be the live cd, rather than the os installed on the hard drive.
Apr
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
3
answered how to install grub on installed ubuntu disk?
Apr
3
comment desktop vs server on a physical server
"the physical servers" is meaningless. What graphics support your particular server hardware has obviously depends on what server hardware you have.
Apr
3
comment Which of the filesystems supported by Ubuntu is the most resistant to file corruption?
@neon_overload, Data journaling can be useful for a big database because you can put the journal on an external disk, like an ssd, and fsync() only has to wait for the data to hit the ssd rather than the big slow disk. It also can help coalesce lots of random writes so they are sent to the slow disk in larger chunks with less seek overhead.
Apr
3
comment Which of the filesystems supported by Ubuntu is the most resistant to file corruption?
@neon_overload, nope, he explains there, as he has many times over the years, that the only way to be sure your file is atomically updated is to write it to a new file, fsync it to disk, then rename it to the original file. Neither a single write() call nor full data journaling ( or both ) is a substitute for this. write() is not atomic because all it does is put the data into the cache. The kernel flushes the cache as it wills.
Apr
3
comment Hex Editor With Writing to HDD's
@Nerotix, for dev in sda sdb sdc ; do dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/$dev & done. It should be fairly obvious how to expand it from 3 to 20.
Apr
3
comment Which of the filesystems supported by Ubuntu is the most resistant to file corruption?
@neon_overload, you are wrong. write() calls are never atomic. More importantly, applications almost never write() the entire file in one go. See Ted Tso ( the author of ext[234] ) correcting someone else with this incorrect belief recently here: bugzilla.kernel.org/show_bug.cgi?id=70121#c7
Apr
2
comment Why can't I resize NTFS partition?
@Rinzwind, since this is askubuntu, there is no need for that; it is assumed the OS is Ubuntu.
Apr
2
comment Why can't I resize NTFS partition?
The filesystem is apparently fubar ( fouled up beyond all recognition ). Try booting into windows and running chkdsk on it.
Apr
2
comment Failed to get canonical path of /cow
possible duplicate of How can I repair grub? (How to get Ubuntu back after installing Windows?)
Apr
2
comment Failed to get canonical path of /cow
No, you have to mount the hard disk and chroot into it, like @green7 said.
Apr
2
comment Ubuntu kicks Windows users from WiFi
Sounds like a Windows problem. If you boot the Ubuntu live cd in one of these other computers and run that for a bit, does it still get kicked off while running Ubuntu?
Apr
2
comment Which of the filesystems supported by Ubuntu is the most resistant to file corruption?
ext4 defaults to ordered, not writeback, and data journaling does not roll anything back; it just makes sure that any data that hit the journal before the crash is copied to the file. As I mentioned in the other comment, this does not stop you from having a partially written, and thus corrupt file when you crash in the middle of writing to it.
Apr
2
comment Which of the filesystems supported by Ubuntu is the most resistant to file corruption?
@neon_overload, no, they can't. They can only ensure that any data that hit the journal before the crash will be copied to the file. Any data that hasn't hit the journal is lost, which may mean you have a partially written, and thus corrupt file.
Apr
2
comment Debian Unstable equivalent in Ubuntu
@Oxwivi, sure, but it still makes no sense to differentiate them the way the OP did. If you want the latest software, then you want the latest package of that software.
Apr
2
comment Debian Unstable equivalent in Ubuntu
@Oxwivi, right.. of course it isn't that hard to manually transition once the new development release opens.
Apr
2
comment Hex Editor With Writing to HDD's
@Nerotix, why wouldn't it be?