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Jul
23
comment How To Find a Computer Name in a LAN from the IP Address?
@Cerin Are you on Linux machine yourself?
May
27
comment How to resize a window when the bottom right is not visible?
Nopes alt-space doesn't work either. Tried alt-f8 too. The issue seems to be that the options are too many in number. It causes the size to exceed the screen limit.
May
27
comment How to resize a window when the bottom right is not visible?
I have Guest Additions. I think I am using VB at its full potential. I think the problem lies some where else. Thanks for the help though!
May
27
comment How to resize a window when the bottom right is not visible?
Sorry I omitted a fact. I don't think it should matter but I am including it in the original question. I am using Virtual Box.
May
27
comment How to resize a window when the bottom right is not visible?
Thanks! I tried it, but it doesn't help. I mean it works but I am still not able to get the window size small enough to see the OK and Cancel buttons. :(
May
26
comment How to turn the Red Light (infrared or optical sound output light) off?
If you can see the red light, I think it cannot be called as infrared. The TV remotes have infrared LEDs and you can't see the light when they are on (unless accompanied by other LEDs in the visible spectrum).
May
26
comment Is there a GUI to edit the PATH variable?
Thanks! I will try it out.
May
26
comment Is there a GUI to edit the PATH variable?
Yeah... mostly I am doing something wrong. But that is where my question lies: which is the surest way to set the PATH variable? My current method is to execute "PATH=/usr/local/texlive/2011/bin/i386-linux:$PATH". But after I reboot, the systems forgets the above assignment.
May
26
comment How to open ~/.pam_environment?
I am having this problem too. Even for me the file .pam_environment doesn't exist. I too referred to the same link. One good point to note is that you can press Ctrl + H to show the hidden files. This is a general recommendation - it won't solve your current problem as the file is simply not there.
May
26
comment Is there a GUI to edit the PATH variable?
In windows there's one place you can go to and edit the path variable. That edit will always work (even after system reboot). But because of all the problems windows has, I hate it. I like Ubuntu but currently I am trying to learn how Ubuntu overcomes the problems in windows. PATH variable has been a thing which has confused me a lot (especially the un-Pythonic way in which it is handled - there's no one way of editing it, every blog recommends a new method).
May
26
comment Is there a GUI to edit the PATH variable?
My current objective is to set the PATH variable to: "/usr/local/texlive/2011/bin/i386-linux". But after I close the session, the system forgets the value of the PATH variable. So to initiate a simple task of running Latex on Ubuntu, I have to go to the folder, copy the path and set the variable each time I have to start using it. So I read different solutions to this problem. Some say edit bashrc, some say edit bash_profile, others say simply profile and some say edit bash_login. In all of this I am confused as to where PATH variable (which is guaranteed to load on login) located!
May
18
comment How to understand the Ubuntu file system layout?
There cannot be a better answer!
May
17
comment How to understand the Ubuntu file system layout?
Got it. I will frame a new question. Even then here's a short explanation of what I meant: In windows, the .exe files can be easily located. For example: "C:\Python27\python.exe". So I know where the program Python starts from. Now if I have to use the Eclipse IDE, I can simply point it to python.exe, and this is what I meant by "configure". I configured the IDE for Python. In Ubuntu where's the location where the program is installed? That is what still evades me.
May
17
comment How to understand the Ubuntu file system layout?
Thanks for all your answers. I am a bit confused about a few points: In Windows the setup usually provides through a prompt an option to install a software for all users. How to make that distinction in Ubuntu? Also, this is a usual problem in configuring development softwares to their IDEs. In windows, for example, in "program files\miktex\bin" there's the file "pdflatex.exe". Thus I can point the IDE to this file and configure it. How to go about this process in Ubuntu? Where's the general binary file associated with a software (esp. from the configuration point of view)?
May
17
comment What's the equivalent of “add or remove programs” in Ubuntu?
@JacobJohanEdwards Thanks for saving the original question! I will split it up and ask separate questions.