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visits member for 2 years, 9 months
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I've been a computer hobbyist since before the IBM PC, and a professional programmer not too long after that. I've had experience with electronic repair, manufacturing, and testing of professional audio.

I tutored other students in Fortran before PCs existed, built my first computer from bare circuit boards and reject parts (S-100 CP/M system), and transitioned from stereo repair, to professional audio manufacturing at Dolby Labs, where I set up the automated functional testing for Dolby professional equipment. From there, I went into programming full-time as a C programmer for Mac presentation graphics systems, then to Windows C++ video programming. My last 10 years was as a C++ Windows software engineer for a corporate source code control system.

I'm now a Linux user, doing part time website development using all open source tools like Vim, PHP, Javascript/jQuery, etc for local businesses. I'm semi-retired, so I only do jobs that I want to do.


Oct
1
comment 32 or 64 bit, which one is suitable for 3GB RAM but legacy specs?
I think that if you have 2GB or less, and you run more than one large app at a time, you will get decreased performance with a 64-bit system due to use of swap, but with only one large app, you'd be OK. So they may be taking the safe route in their advice. But it's still not addressing a 32-bit system with more than that - it implies that you should use the 64-bit version, which is not correct.
Oct
1
comment Is Ubuntu 32-bit only for systems with “less than 2GB RAM”?
I just want to say that, despite the accurate information in this post, it makes very little sense to me as a whole. But then, the issue also makes little sense. What if you have a 32-bit system with more than 2GB - do you have to use a 64-bit version? If you have a 64-bit processor with less than 2GB, why do you need to use the 32-bit version when the 64-bit version is probably better? Your answer needs more research, IMHO.
Oct
1
comment 32 or 64 bit, which one is suitable for 3GB RAM but legacy specs?
I would say the short answer is that the "64-bit Mac" version is for an Apple Mac system. I've never used it, but there is some info in this answer.
Oct
1
comment I cannot run a .sh file
Google search: "UnsupportedClassVersionError: QBootLoader" finds lots of the same error; did you try at all to find the answer?
Sep
30
comment 32 or 64 bit, which one is suitable for 3GB RAM but legacy specs?
I hate to say this, but the guidelines on the Ubuntu download page don't seem to make any sense at all. It doesn't even address whether you have a 32-bit or 64-bit CPU. And a 32-bit OS can access (approximately) 4 GB or memory.
Sep
30
answered 32 or 64 bit, which one is suitable for 3GB RAM but legacy specs?
Sep
30
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How do you restore an encrypted hard drive? Password being available
Sep
30
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Can I remove cpp from Ubuntu without causing any issues?
Sep
30
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How to run BitTorrent Sync?
Sep
30
revised Adding another Ubuntu
added 396 characters in body
Sep
30
answered Adding another Ubuntu
Sep
30
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Reset Zsh config?
Sep
29
reviewed Approve suggested edit on No sound in Ubuntu 12.04
Sep
29
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Adding unread message count to terminal command prompt
Sep
29
reviewed Reject suggested edit on How to install wine on ubuntu 12.10?
Sep
29
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Unable to delete a file in Ubuntu 12.04
Sep
28
comment How to delete a non-empty directory in Terminal?
"SUDO" is not a command - "sudo" is. Nevertheless, you do not use sudo to delete a non-empty directory, you use it to delete a file that is not owned by you. Doing this as a matter of course is dangerous and not very smart, as you should not be blindly deleting files you do not own.
Sep
28
reviewed Reject suggested edit on How to delete a non-empty directory in Terminal?
Sep
28
comment Linux dropfolder where users can't delete files
You should edit your question, then. But my guess is you want the files to be rw--w----(620). If they are executable files, then it would be rwx--wx---- (730).
Sep
28
comment Linux dropfolder where users can't delete files
Remember, there are permissions for both files and folders. You can make a folder read or write only. Also, a folder is normally executable, but if you don't make it executable, it can't be listed or entered, but files can be read or written to if specified (and if appropriate permissions are set).