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Jan
28
comment This computer will soon stop receiving Google Chrome updates because this Linux system will no longer be supported
You may also want to consider the Vivaldi browser. It's relatively new and under active development. It supports some chrome add-ons. Some of the folks are from the Opera browser community. vivaldi.com/download
Jan
14
comment Prevent all commands from being defined as an alias
+1 in general, but also specifically for classifying this as an X/Y problem.
Jan
3
comment How to use manual partitioning during installation?
Although many people go this route (and it works fine), I prefer to just boot up a standalone gparted distro and do all my partitioning first. I especially like that it "does" everything and shows you how it will turn out before it actually writes anything to the disk. That way, it's easy to say "oops" and just start over if you make a mistake or change your mind about any of the details.
Dec
18
comment Where should I keep my personal files while keeping the pathname short?
Right. Generally, you would add the alias definition in .bashrc in your home directory, or , if you have it setup to be read, you can add it to .bash_aliases in your home directory. An alias only works at the start of a command line, but a function will work anywhere. They're just a bit more tricky to use for something like this.
Dec
4
comment Ubuntu source package dependency tree
I don't know makemuch at all, but I was under the impression that you could define make rules to do just about anything - not just run a compile. I'll bet rules could be configured to build a deb or just about anything else - if one knew how.
Dec
2
comment Ubuntu source package dependency tree
I don't do stuff at this level on Linux, but I think that was what make was invented for. A makefile includes rules which determine what needs to be recompiled/rebuilt based on what has changed.
Nov
12
comment grep command and [ ]
ps -f | grep foo | grtep -v grep should be ps -f | grep foo | grep -v grep. I only found 3 characters to change in the entire answer and it won't allow an edit with less than 6 characters.
Nov
12
comment How would you count every occurrence of a term in all files in the current directory?
This appears to be the only answer which counts all occurrences of the term as the OP requested. AFAIK, all the solutions using grep will count all the lines on which the term occurs, so a line which includes the term three times will only count as one occurrence.
Nov
12
comment Why does Python in Linux require the line #!/usr/bin/python?
Great answer. +1
Nov
10
comment What does installing/removing an updated kernel version do which takes so long?
Thanks for the detailed answer. I'm not dealing with any VMs at the moment. In my simple case, I wouldn't expect any services to restart until after/as part of the reboot and I wasn't counting that time. I had not run into System.map. I looked it up at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/System.map. Mine is over 70,000 lines long.
Oct
30
comment Include command in output file?
I thought this would be easier, but it's kind of convoluted. Here's a small test script along the lines of what I was thinking, but I'm not sure it proves anything. dl.dropbox.com/u/54584985/mytest_side_effects
Oct
30
comment How can I copy text from dialog boxes and menus?
I thought of the screenshot part, but adding the OCR is genius!
Oct
30
comment Reinstall base Ubuntu without formatting or removing manually installed packages
This is a bit over my level of expertise, but wouldn't it be easier to get a packages list from a fresh install, diff it against your current install to get a list of everything added. Then do a fresh install and automagically add back in all the custom stuff - possibly with a restore of some or all of the config files in $HOME? You get the lists by running dpkg -l. This will probably mark a lot of the additional stuff as manually installed - rather than as dependencies which could go away if the package that needed them is deleted later.
Oct
30
comment Include command in output file?
This is the best answer because using script avoids any side effects from arguments which might execute code when displayed with echo, etc. - making the second, intended, execution possibly give different results than if the command was run separately.
Oct
30
comment Include command in output file?
This is the "obvious" answer and works great unless any of the arguments involve code that executes and has side effects which might accumulate. This is an edge case, so it wouldn't occur very often.
Oct
17
comment Referencing variables in a shell script
I didn't want to edit your otherwise excellent answer, but shouldn't $ var="foo *" be $ foo="foo *"? You don't use var anywhere.
Sep
30
comment D missing from terminal keybinds - have to add it on every login
@terdon - Yes, that's usually better - unless something has reset/changed it since the login shell started.
Sep
26
comment How do I run 'sudo' command inside a script?
A lot of scripts I write do a whole bunch of user interaction and/or error checking. Then one command at the end - something like rsync - needs to be run as root. Why would I want to make the whole thing run elevated and leave myself open to many lines of code that could contain serious errors or vulnerabilities with root access - especially while debugging - when only one or a few commands require that access?
Sep
13
comment find vs. locate
@ByteCommander - It's a settable parameter. It usually runs around 10 or 15 minutes after boot to avoid such problems. I don't know what, if anything, it does with priorities. I suspect nothing. It has its own table similar to crontab which allows very fine control of how it works, but is usually fine with just the defaults.
Sep
10
comment D missing from terminal keybinds - have to add it on every login
Until you find a real answer to your problem, you can add the bind command to $HOME/.bashrc and it will be run whenever you open a shell (at least if you're using bash). It's likely that there are equivalent options for other shells.