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  • 236 votes cast
Sep
4
comment How to automatically set “Always on visible workspace” for windows on particular monitor
I have no experience with what you're trying to do, but, if you don't get a better solution, you might look into using AutoKey macros to automate the processes you use to open windows on your second desktop and set their window/display properties at the same time. code.google.com/p/autokey
Aug
29
comment Black screen during boot after TTY1 login
Since your install was a new one - without too much extra effort invested in configuration and enhancement, a clean install was certainly the best solution. There's no second guessing about what you might have borked. And the context of any problem you still run into can easily be understood by those you ask. Now, just make full backups while things work, so you don't have to start again from scratch.
Aug
28
comment Before you login you must answer me these questions 3?
If you don't mind a text-based solution, couldn't you just write a simple shell script that asks a few questions and checks the answers. If the answers are correct, then do a startx, otherwise, do a logout. Then, edit /etc/passwd and make this script their login shell. It's way less elegant than the above solution, but way simpler to code and maintain. It should also be relatively distro/desktop independent. You would also need to test it to make sure it handles things like sigint (Ctrl_C) gracefully.
Aug
25
awarded  Yearling
Aug
21
comment How to install an init.d script in ubuntu?
I don't have time for an answer now, but, if you want this to run as part of your startup, then I think you have to add links to your script in the various runlevel directories so Linux will handle starting and stopping it for you. (/etc/rc[0-6].d) This process is gradually being replaced by a newer method (I think it's called upstart.), but I haven't looked into that at all. The link in your post addresses some of this.
Aug
21
comment Why does an external USB hub show up under different USB bus/port numbers than other devices plugged into the same port?
Again, for disk devices only, you can also add entries for them to /etc/fstab using their uuids and control whether and how they get mounted when plugged in. That's a whole separate question/answer to cover the details, but it's not too complicated.
Aug
21
comment Why does an external USB hub show up under different USB bus/port numbers than other devices plugged into the same port?
If your devices are disk drives,they get assigned unique uuids when the partitions are formatted. You can use those to access the devices uniquely wherever they get plugged in. You can also find them by their partition labels (good reason to use human readable labels). Check out /dev/disk/by-uuid and /dev/disk/by-label using ls -l to see what's where. I don't know of anything similar for non-disk devices, but there may be something in hal land that can help you. I have bash functions I can post for dealing with disk labels and uuids if that would help.
Aug
21
comment Why does an external USB hub show up under different USB bus/port numbers than other devices plugged into the same port?
No idea, but I'm going to guess that it has something to do with the fact that you're adding a new hub, not just a device.
Aug
1
comment Can I start a program from the terminal and make it launch visually in the background?
If you are using the KDE desktop, then the kstart command allows you to start applications while also specifying KDE/QT options that control window behavior. I don't see anything that does exactly what you want, but --tosystray or --onbottom might come close. I've found it quite difficult to find good documentation on kstart. kstart --help-all > kstart.txt will get you started.
Jul
21
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jul
17
answered How do I run a simple Zenity script after disconnecting from WiFi?
Jul
17
comment Why do I need to type `./` before executing a program in the current directory?
This is a handy trick if it is used sparingly. Using it a lot makes your system do things that someone else would not expect. Also, when you do backups, symlinks have to be handled specially. By default, rsync doesn't process them at all, so when you restore they're not there.
Jul
17
comment I can't use the terminal while gedit command is running
This works terribly when combined with sudo. That's part of why gksudo and kdesudo were implemented. I just ran your example and it worked, but what it did was leave sudo waiting in the background for a password. gedit was not even started. I had to do an fg to bring it up. Then, I could enter the password and run gedit. Maybe you're relying on the sudo password timeout to skip the password the second time you run it, but that's often set to 0 by default and shouldn't be relied upon. You're essentially doing something twice to do it once. That clutters your history and opens you to errors.
Jul
17
comment I can't use the terminal while gedit command is running
A new terminal window just clutters the desktop, even if it's minimized. Using & with or without disown is much simpler and cleaner.
Jul
17
comment I can't use the terminal while gedit command is running
It's a bad idea to use alias to redefine common commands. You'll find lots of threads about it on stackexchange. It is fine to use an alias with a different name. In a nutshell, aliasing existing commands creates unexpected behavior on your machine if someone else ever uses it (like when trying to help you fix some other problem) and it does the same thing to you when you use another system without those aliases and your commands don't work as you expect. One of the poster children for this is alias rm='rm -i'. It gets you used to deleting things with a second chance that's not always there.
Jul
17
comment I can't use the terminal while gedit command is running
@JonKiparsky Amusing example - does make the point.
Jul
17
comment Replacing Windows with Linux Ubuntu 12.04 LTS
Although you may not want to do it right away and wait until you know a bit more about Linux, it's really good to move /home onto its own partition and possibly create another partition just for data. That makes backups and upgrades much easier. It also helps prevent running out of disk space needed to run Linux after storing too many data files on the main (/ or root) partition. There are posts on stackexchange covering how to do this.
Jul
17
comment Replacing Windows with Linux Ubuntu 12.04 LTS
Some systems also have a hidden rescue partition that can be used to reinstall Windows. If you're really done with Windows, you'll want to delete that as well before making the Linux partition bigger.
Jul
17
comment New Install and No Internet Connection
Compare the outputs of dmesg (piped into less or saved in a file so it doesn't just fly by on the console) from boot and LiveCD boot looking for network stuff. Search for: For wifi "cfg80211","wifi","wlan0". For Ethernet "eth0". They may provide clues to someone on this forum as to what is going on.
Jun
27
comment Is there any program designed for writing a book?
+1 Never heard of plume-creator. I'm heading over to check it out now.