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May
13
reviewed Close Google drive not working
May
13
reviewed Looks OK How to set up mail in terminal to use email
May
13
reviewed Approve Setup 3rd/4th level characters (typographic layout)
May
13
reviewed Approve Unable to login from User account or Guest account (not a duplicate question)
May
13
comment after 12.04 upgrade: can't log in although password is correct
possible duplicate of Ubuntu gets stuck in a login loop
May
12
revised How to get a basic script to run on startup
improved code formatting
May
12
comment How can I use “find” in a shell script to search from the current directory?
Since you initially suggest test and [...], which aren't equivalent to the [[ shell keyword in the example, you may want to clarify how syntax should be modified for test or [. Unlike [[ (where it works either way), $a should be quoted when passed as an argument to test/[, unless known not to contain whitespace. Also, whether or not [[ is used, if the filename read by read -r a contains leading or trailing whitespace, it will be trimmed off--so unless that is desired, use IFS read -r a to prevent it.
May
12
comment How can I use “find” in a shell script to search from the current directory?
According to Gilles, it can improve performance due to buffered I/O. That is, before the output is read, find will continue walking the directory hierarchy. I suppose that, if there are many more directories to search but no other matches, the performance improvement could be significant.
May
12
comment How can I use “find” in a shell script to search from the current directory?
Since Ubuntu has GNU find, -print -quit can be added to the end of the find command to slightly improve performance. You could even print only a blank line: -printf '\n' -quit This doesn't change find's exit status, of course; piping to grep -q remains necessary.
May
12
revised How can I use “find” in a shell script to search from the current directory?
restored "from" as comment discussion suggests that may affect the meaning (sorry for removing this before)
May
12
revised How can I use “find” in a shell script to search from the current directory?
edited tags; edited title
May
12
reviewed Close i am unable to connect wifi in Dell Inspiron 3420 with Ubuntu 14.04
May
12
reviewed Reject aws tag wiki
May
12
reviewed Approve Set up Landscape to run on Azure
May
12
reviewed Approve aws tag wiki excerpt
May
12
reviewed Edit Ubuntu 14.04 64bit iso file can't be written on DVD-R (from Windows)
May
12
revised Ubuntu 14.04 64bit iso file can't be written on DVD-R (from Windows)
Replaced CD with DVD (which is actually used by the OP)
May
12
revised Does Ubuntu contain Non-free kernel blobs and other non-free system components?
added 1 character in body; edited tags
May
12
comment Is the latest version of Ubuntu 100% FREE
Reviewers: I don't think this should be considered unclear or a duplicate, because wondering about the differing ways "free" is used in connection with Ubuntu and what Ubuntu's status is with respect to them is an extremely common state of mind for people who are new to Ubuntu and other FOSS communities. My answer started out as unsubmitted text in a comment box asking the OP to clarify what meaning of "free" they were using. As I typed I realized that even clearly requesting that clarification would entail posting a complete answer addressing both meanings.
May
12
reviewed Approve r tag wiki