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visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 10 hours ago

10h
comment Upgrading from 2 to 4 monitors
I'd try using generating an initial config with 4 separate screens there (at which point they probably would function as 4 separate monitors) and then merging them together using Xinerama.
10h
comment Upgrading from 2 to 4 monitors
I started from an auto-generated one and then edited it manually. I'm pretty sure you'll have to create yours manually - last time I tried the task was beyond of what nvidia-config or other tools could do.
10h
comment Upgrading from 2 to 4 monitors
I think the magic bit in my config is enabling Xinerama in the ServerLayout section. Also note that I have all 4 monitors as separate "entities" in the config - I'm not sure, but yours totally looks like you've only got 2 monitors.
10h
comment Upgrading from 2 to 4 monitors
I think you forgot to attach your xorg.conf
1d
comment Ubuntu 12.04 and Quad Monitors?
@Marjeta: it used to work just fine on 12.04 until I upgraded to the next version. Still works fine on 13.10
Apr
2
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
24
awarded  Good Answer
Mar
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
17
answered What's the best way to make a Qt executable program run as a service in Ubuntu
Mar
16
comment Increase partition size on which Ubuntu is installed?
@EliahKagan: Ok, I've tried Gilles's "recipe" and it does indeed work nicely. I've revised my answer with a detailed list of steps to enlarge a "live" partition without booting from an external medium. You may remove your downvote now ;)
Mar
16
revised Increase partition size on which Ubuntu is installed?
added a list of steps
Mar
16
comment Increase partition size on which Ubuntu is installed?
@EliahKagan: ok, you're right, I need to try it myself :) Let's see if I have a spare HDD to play with...
Mar
15
comment Increase partition size on which Ubuntu is installed?
@EliahKagan: Please have a look at the answer (from Gilles) I linked to. The idea is that it is possible to use fdisk to enlarge the partition, while the OS continues to use the smaller filesystem. Then. after a reboot, after kernel re-reads the updated partition table, we can resize the filesystem because it now lives in a larger partition.
Mar
10
awarded  Enlightened
Mar
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
5
comment What are the differences between 32-bit and 64-bit, and which should I choose?
@nealmcb: You're limited to ~3Gb of RAM per process in 32-bit mode, even with PAE and everything. So it won't help you with Firefox (although it might help with Chrome because it is using a separate process for each tab).
Mar
4
comment What are the differences between 32-bit and 64-bit, and which should I choose?
@nealmcb: In the charts above you can see LibreOffice + Firefox combo, and it follows the general trend of 64-bit code using more memory. Once the system starts swapping any difference in CPU speed is not really relevant I believe. In case of a 8Gb system a 64-bit OS is definitely a better choice though.
Mar
4
comment How do I find out what Ubuntu distro was originally installed on a machine?
@Lucio: yeah, the /var/log/installer/media-info is a bit magical - some people reported it existing on their machines, and some don't have it, as you can see from the accepted answer to the question I linked to. The /etc/apt/sources.list used to be more reliable, but the file doesn't exist anymore in modern releases of Ubuntu. The OP was asking about 12.04 though, so should work for him.
Mar
4
answered How do I find out what Ubuntu distro was originally installed on a machine?