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Apr
10
comment Accidentally created directory named “~” (tilde)
@ChrisJefferson: If you want to check your command first, use ls -d to see if it lists the directory or file you want it to. No need for anything with an effect like mv.
Mar
20
comment If I dual boot Windows 10 and Ubuntu, could a keylogger affect me if i'm on Ubuntu?
This is highly unlikely. If malware was going to attack the other OS in a dual boot system, it wouldn't just modify the boot loader that ultimately loads Linux (GRUB stage 2), let alone just the boot sector or earlier GRUB stages. Once Linux (the kernel) is loaded, it takes over. For a modified GRUB to infect Linux at boot time, it would have to make a complicated modification to the kernel and/or the initrd as they were being loaded. But they're compressed, and decompress themselves on the fly. Easier for win malware to use an ext4 library and write to the root FS.
Mar
20
comment If I dual boot Windows 10 and Ubuntu, could a keylogger affect me if i'm on Ubuntu?
Malware can include code to read/write ext4 / xfs / btrfs if it wants to, so it can try to infest the Linux side of dual boot systems. It's not like a few hundred extra kB of code will make a piece of malware harder to hide.
Mar
18
comment ZSH removed, cannot relogin
Linux desktops have kind of broken the .profile-for-env-vars and one-per-login stuff / .bashrc-for-aliases paradigm. Since you sometimes need env vars set for stuff to work, I can see why one might think it's a good idea to source ~/.profile from .bashrc. (Logging in to a desktop session might not source your profile to set env vars for all children of the session.)
Mar
17
revised Terminal: List all directories for which a user or group has write permission
added 307 characters in body
Mar
17
comment Terminal: List all directories for which a user or group has write permission
@Oli: Oh right, I overlooked the x without r case. Thanks. I guess we could construct a find command line with a shell loop that iterates over the user's secondary groups, if we don't want to just pipe root-find output into another process that does access(2) checks as the user. That 2nd process could be find -writable.
Mar
17
comment Terminal: List all directories for which a user or group has write permission
@Oli: Or just use GNU find's -writable, like I did in my answer. It uses access(2) to check writeability.
Mar
17
revised Terminal: List all directories for which a user or group has write permission
deleted 1 character in body
Mar
17
revised Terminal: List all directories for which a user or group has write permission
deleted 1 character in body
Mar
17
answered Terminal: List all directories for which a user or group has write permission
Mar
17
comment Terminal: List all directories for which a user or group has write permission
@Oli and Rinzwind: this misses directories with group-ownership of one of the user's secondary groups, doesn't it? e.g. chown root:users /data/share && chmod 2775 /data/share, where some accounts are members of the users group.
Mar
12
comment How to rename these files with regex?
I always use and recommend the current Ubuntu release, not the LTS. Nobody wants to run into old bugs that are fixed in the current versions of things, and writing bug reports against old versions is usually a lot less useful.
Mar
12
comment How to rename these files with regex?
On my Ubuntu 15.10: /usr/bin/prename is from the perl package. /usr/bin/rename is a symlink, through /etc/alternatives/rename, to /usr/bin/file-rename from the rename package. That package's description says it's "intended to replace the version currently supplied by the perl package", so I guess it's the better choice.
Mar
12
comment How to rename these files with regex?
There's another very similar rename command shipped by ubuntu: prename. The exact same args should work for it, too, but the implementation is different.
Feb
27
comment How can I quickly copy a GPT partition scheme from one hard drive to another?
update on this: sfdisk now accepts whatever you give it when used this way, including a small boot partition following the GPT, ending at 1MB. unix.stackexchange.com/a/12988/79808
Feb
19
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
29
comment How do I open the man page for square brackets math and what are they called?
Wow, I had no idea $[] was a thing. I expected from the title that the answer was going to be man '['. (i.e. test)
Jan
18
comment What version of Ubuntu should I pick?
I just picked Ubuntu/Kubuntu as an example. They all still use the same repos. I assumed the OP would be smart enough to pick the 32bit version if he actually has an old Atom CPU that can't run 64bit code. Why do you get worse perf with 64bit? Are you forced to run some 32bit-only program like Skype, so both versions of libraries would have to be in memory at the same time?
Jan
18
answered What version of Ubuntu should I pick?
Jan
18
comment What version of Ubuntu should I pick?
In my experience, desktop drivers are no more stable in LTS releases than in regular releases. I don't think regressions are common in new-user desktop experience, so I'd recommend the latest stable release (15.10). It's not so much "less stable", it's just that you'll have to upgrade sooner. Also, 14.04 is from before the switch to systemd, so you're more and more likely to run into trouble mixing and matching software from 14.04 with 3rd party packages, and with instructions on how to do things.