Reputation
878
Top tag
Next privilege 1,000 Rep.
See votes, expandable usercard
Badges
8 25
Impact
~160k people reached

Dec
27
revised What is the best way to shrink HD Quicktime MOV files
Fix broken link
Dec
27
suggested approved edit on What is the best way to shrink HD Quicktime MOV files
Dec
22
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
20
awarded  Yearling
Dec
1
comment How to check if running as root? Not asking for sudo
@Darael thanks, both of those are good points - I didn't realize there was sudo -e as well. I guess I don't really think of nano as a customizable text editor but that is something worth mentioning, thanks!
Nov
20
comment How to check if running as root? Not asking for sudo
Yes - that would cause this! When you copy/move a file from one directory to another, chances are you are keeping permissions, and the owner of the file (definitely so if you use a file manager to do this, or you are moving the file). If you want to change the permissions on these files so that they are all owned by root, you can use sudo chown root:root <file> or sudo chown -Rc root:root <directory>. -R is recursive, -c lists all changes. Also check out the answers below from other people, they describe file permissions more in depth if you need that.
Nov
20
comment How to check if running as root? Not asking for sudo
I think the only reason a file would be owned by you is if you created it without sudo. Where exactly on the filesystem is the file owned by you? It might be in a directory which allows editing by all users (the directory would look like drwxrwxrwx in ls), which would allow you to create a file owned by yourself.
Nov
20
comment How to check if running as root? Not asking for sudo
This isn't a complete answer to your question, but if you want to know who you are logged in as use the whoami command. Use ls -l <file> to list the user which owns a file (to see who can edit it). Side note: to stop root from owning configuration/temporary files in your home directory, you may want to use sudoedit instead of sudo nano; sudoedit works exactly like sudo nano except that it won't let nano write files in your home directory as root.
Oct
18
comment What is the Command Line Equivalent of “Safely Remove Drive”?
Ah, might be a difference with Ubuntu server then. Detach does work without root permission on my desktop.
Oct
18
comment What is the Command Line Equivalent of “Safely Remove Drive”?
What version of Ubuntu are you running? Also, how did you mount the drive? If you mounted using root permissions, or when logged in as another user (as opposed to Nautilus or udisks in the current user), your user won't have permission to unmount using udisks.
Jul
29
comment I accidently ran 'sudo chmod -R 775 /' and it completely broke my OS/Shell
It would probably be much, much harder for you to try to restore your system than to just reinstall it at this point. I would suggest getting any data you have to another partition, and reinstalling. Reinstalling ubuntu is pretty easy if you have enough hard drive space to backup all your data onto a separate partition.
May
31
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
28
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
10
awarded  Enlightened
Mar
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
20
awarded  Yearling
Dec
9
comment Can I download iTunes?
Possible duplicate of askubuntu.com/questions/414737/…?
Dec
8
accepted `squashfs-tools` creates incorrectly compressed file
Dec
8
comment `squashfs-tools` creates incorrectly compressed file
Awesome, using the development version worked!