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awarded  Notable Question
8h
comment Trouble Accessing Mac OS X Partition from Ubuntu 14.04
@bzodonnell See my previous comment for the answer to your follow ups.
8h
comment Trouble Accessing Mac OS X Partition from Ubuntu 14.04
(1) This is to be run on your Ubuntu partition. Try -p instead. (2) UID and GID are for the Ubuntu user not the Mac user - this says you want the system to mount with UID/GID for Ubuntu. Mac is evil with perms though. Read the man page for mount options and learn what they do. (3) As long as you change your uid and gid back to what they were breakage should be minimal. If you are really concerned then do a fresh Ubuntu reinstall. It's insanely easy to break permissions if the wrong uid or gid is set which is why I put so much emphasis to my warning at the beginning of my answer.
8h
revised Is running packages from Ubuntu universe more risky than running the same packages on Debian?
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8h
comment “gzip: stdout: No space left on device” error message when updating
@karel I think the deps problem is due to them running out of disk space somewhere since gzip says so in the error trace back
8h
comment Problems installing postgresql-9.4
13.10 Saucy has been past end of life for some time and is offtopic. Use a supported Ubuntu release.
8h
revised ubuntu 15 login or lock not working
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10h
revised Trouble Accessing Mac OS X Partition from Ubuntu 14.04
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11h
revised Trouble Accessing Mac OS X Partition from Ubuntu 14.04
Added the massive warning against changing a user's uid and gid without knowing what they're doing.
11h
answered Trouble Accessing Mac OS X Partition from Ubuntu 14.04
12h
comment Is running packages from Ubuntu universe more risky than running the same packages on Debian?
@sampie Correct. In Ubuntu a similar policy is in place, except it's up to maintainers to handle the security update prep and the security team doesn't provide notice. With the exception of packages I watch like a hawk (of which I try and provide patches to the security team for updating software), maintainers or the community provide patches for those CVEs and issues to the Ubuntu Security Team, and they process it according to their policies.
18h
revised Is running packages from Ubuntu universe more risky than running the same packages on Debian?
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18h
comment Is running packages from Ubuntu universe more risky than running the same packages on Debian?
@sampie from Debian Security's IRC, my assessment as follows is a good summary according to them, that this sums it up nicely: "The Debian security team provides support for all packages, with the help of package maintainers and upstream, but they don't personally patch everything." So you may still run into cases where things aren't patched in a timely manner. Major software and core security vulns (like OpenSSL) are expediently handled, but an obscure package might not.
18h
revised Is running packages from Ubuntu universe more risky than running the same packages on Debian?
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18h
comment Is running packages from Ubuntu universe more risky than running the same packages on Debian?
@sampie I'm pretty certain the Debian Security team doesn't do any patching of software except critical components, and just lets maintainers know if they're not patched with something (observed this on nginx, znc, and some other packages). You will see this in every OS though, security teams put emphasis on core, critical components vs. others. I'll ask in their IRC channel, but i'm almost certain this is the case.
18h
comment Is running packages from Ubuntu universe more risky than running the same packages on Debian?
@RobieBasak You're entitled to that opinion. I voted to close as too broad and my reasoning for that is that "Are there any concerns with security... of universe packages" and "Am I in risk" are two very different, extraordinarily broad questions. In the IT Security professional community, we say that there is no system that is not vulnerable to something, and that there are steps to protect and mitigate the risk of being exploited, however that's a practice that can't be summarized here. My answer is very general, but touches upon all points as such, while also touching on Universe security
19h
comment How to install Windows 10 and OS X on a laptop pre-installed with Ubuntu?
@Zacharee1 RAM isn't major hardware. You also missed my point, and my guess is you're going to continue to suggest ways to get around the license agreement, which could be a violation of certain countries' laws or regulations. There's other ways to identify how it's not an Apple hardware as well, but that's irrelevant here.
19h
comment How to install Windows 10 and OS X on a laptop pre-installed with Ubuntu?
@Zacharee1 except you can easily determine if it's Apple hardware because they use specific system boards, specific hardware, etc. Any variance thereof of major components immediately voids the agreement.
19h
answered Is running packages from Ubuntu universe more risky than running the same packages on Debian?
19h
revised Is running packages from Ubuntu universe more risky than running the same packages on Debian?
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