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comment How to use https with apt-get?
@TheGreatContini The public key is part of the initial installation image. You need to download that over HTTPS to bootstrap the security. HTTPS, in turn, uses a certificate chain which goes back to some signatures that shipped with the browser or OS that you used to download the installation image.
Apr
26
comment What is the difference between /etc/init/ and /etc/init.d/?
@Palo Upstart itself doesn't use /etc/init.d/* or /etc/rc*.d/*, but there are an Upstart jobs /etc/init/rc.conf and /etc/init/rcS.conf that load them.
Apr
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
12
reviewed Edit How can I disable usb-autosuspend for a specific device?
Apr
12
revised How can I disable usb-autosuspend for a specific device?
Info for laptop-mode-tools 1.66
Apr
12
reviewed Reject installing win7 x64 in VirtualBox - error driver device missing
Apr
12
reviewed Approve How many bytes in 1 block or 1 inode?
Apr
4
comment What is the action performed by the “Quit” option in application launcher icon?
What makes you think it's sending a D-Bus message then?
Apr
4
comment What is the action performed by the “Quit” option in application launcher icon?
I don't understand the question. Are you trying to find out how to send a similar D-Bus message, i.e. how to make a command sendquit that sends a similar quit notification? What parameter would it take?
Mar
31
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
21
comment Why are all my DNS queries received from 127.0.0.1?
@BluePython No. You need to distinguish two sets of DNS servers: the servers that applications query (recorded in /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d), and the servers that the machine queries (recorded in /etc/resolvconf/run/interface). On a modern Ubuntu under the default configuration, applications query the locally-running dnsmasq (they know because /etc/resolv.conf is built from /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d), and that dnsmasq instance queries the external servers (from information in /etc/resolvconf/run/interface).
Mar
20
comment Why are all my DNS queries received from 127.0.0.1?
@BluePython The servers in that directory are the ones used by programs running on this machine. Normally there's only 127.0.0.1. The DNS servers from the that your machine queries are calculated at runtime based on the available network connections, and they're recorded under /etc/resolvconf/run/interface`. Dnsmasq is the only program that uses this information: applications contact dnsmasq and dnsmasq contacts the external DNS servers.
Mar
11
awarded  Necromancer
Feb
29
awarded  Great Answer
Jan
25
comment How would I speed up a full disk dd?
@NickYeates That's not any of the commands given here. Your command because the redirection is performed by the shell that launches sudo, not by a process launched by sudo. You can use sudo sh -c 'cat linuxmint-17.3-cinnamon-64bit.iso >/dev/disk1' or <linuxmint-17.3-cinnamon-64bit.iso sudo tee /dev/disk1 >/dev/null
Jan
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
19
revised How to connect to Protected EAP (PEAP) wifi via terminal
added attribution
Jan
4
comment My processor is 64-bit - does that mean I need the amd64 image?
@Jelly No, they're called 32-bit, because virtual addresses are on 32 bits. Physical addresses (which are only used internally in some places in the kernel) use 64 bits. You can call it a “32-bit kernel with 64-bit physical addresses”, but by no means a “36-bit” or “64-bit kernel” — that would mean that pointers (i.e. virtual addresses) use 36 or 64 bits. The limit to 2^36 isn't due to the number of bits in pointers, but the number of bits spanned by MMU descriptors and on some buses; these have no reason to be powers of 2.
Jan
4
comment My processor is 64-bit - does that mean I need the amd64 image?
@Jelly PAE kernels (which includes the default kernel since 12.04) can access up to 64GB.
Jan
4
comment My processor is 64-bit - does that mean I need the amd64 image?
@Jelly I don't understand your comment. Were you reporting a typo? The only occurrence of “32-bit kernel” in my answer is correct. (Of course the sentence is also correct for a 64-bit kernel, but that isn't interesting.)